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Thread: How do you deal with sanitisation of old drives?

  1. #11
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    I'll have to make some more videos this summer, I have a pile of drives that are going to need to be destroyed. I'm thinking 12Gauge slug is going to be this summer, if I get find a place to shoot.
    I know a guy that is into long range shooting and has a few Sharps rifles. He casts his own bullets for them as well. That would scatter a drive pretty well. Might be time to start figuring out how to build an armored camera rig.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

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    Jenkem Addict imported_wyze's Avatar
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    dd if=/dev/swc666 of=/dev/wyze

  3. #13
    Very good friend of the forum hhmatt's Avatar
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    Some prefer to physically destroy the drive by drilling holes through it. Or other creative means.

    Most people that want to give the drive away do a DoD 5200.28-STD disk wipe exactly like the one in DBAN (Deriks boot and nuke) DoD actually stands for Department of Defense the series of numbers after the DoD is one of thier policies I believe and it has an algorithm to write random data over every sector of the drive.

    Using the DoD wipe with a 3 time pass is typically good enough for the average person.

    If my memory serves me correctly:

    The U.S. Military does 7 passes.

    The Department of Defense does 9+ passes.

    From what I've read about the actual wipe the more passes the better of course and its very unlikely anything will be recovered since the data is overwritten soo many times with a random algorithm. The theory behind being being able to recover the data comes from being able to reverse the algorithm which is nearly impossible in this case. You would need a super computer probably several of them and its just not worth the time and effort to extract your information.

    The algorithm is apparently a true random algorithm and not a pseudo-random algorithm. If you want to know the difference you can check out wikipedia or google.

  4. #14
    Member imported_anubis2k7's Avatar
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  5. #15
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    HDDErase (available here: http://cmrr.ucsd.edu/people/Hughes/SecureErase.shtml) is very good, is free, and is tiny

  6. #16
    My life is this forum thorin's Avatar
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    It depends on a number of factors:

    1) How sensitive is the information?
    2) How much time (and other resources) can you reasonably expect a malicious individual to expend in getting the data?
    3) How motivated would a malicious individual be to get the data?

    A number of Governments publically release their destruction standards.

    Off the top of my head I can state that in the majority of circumstances the Canadian Gov't requires triple overwrite for mildly sensitive information. To find specifics check RCMP and CSE websites.

    For the majority of home users DBAN is more than sufficient.
    I'm a compulsive post editor, you might wanna wait until my post has been online for 5-10 mins before quoting it as it will likely change.

    I know I seem harsh in some of my replies. SORRY! But if you're doing something illegal or posting something that seems to be obvious BS I'm going to call you on it.

  7. #17
    Junior Member pipboy's Avatar
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    Thermite.. Easy to make, Does the job well :P

  8. #18
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pipboy View Post
    Thermite.. Easy to make, Does the job well :P
    ...and those that don't know how to make Thermite, feel free to google for the recipe, but be sure to do it from your home ISP account.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

  9. #19
    Junior Member pipboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    ...and those that don't know how to make Thermite, feel free to google for the recipe, but be sure to do it from your home ISP account.
    While your at it, look up flight schedules going to washington

  10. #20
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hhmatt81 View Post
    Some prefer to physically destroy the drive by drilling holes through it. Or other creative means.

    Most people that want to give the drive away do a DoD 5200.28-STD disk wipe exactly like the one in DBAN (Deriks boot and nuke) DoD actually stands for Department of Defense the series of numbers after the DoD is one of thier policies I believe and it has an algorithm to write random data over every sector of the drive.

    Using the DoD wipe with a 3 time pass is typically good enough for the average person.

    If my memory serves me correctly:

    The U.S. Military does 7 passes.

    The Department of Defense does 9+ passes.

    From what I've read about the actual wipe the more passes the better of course and its very unlikely anything will be recovered since the data is overwritten soo many times with a random algorithm. The theory behind being being able to recover the data comes from being able to reverse the algorithm which is nearly impossible in this case. You would need a super computer probably several of them and its just not worth the time and effort to extract your information.

    The algorithm is apparently a true random algorithm and not a pseudo-random algorithm. If you want to know the difference you can check out wikipedia or google.
    DOD slags the drives that were used for classified info.

    Hey, wait a minute! Where's theprez?? He could give us the definitive answer on properly wiping a drive.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

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