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Thread: Install bt3 on sdhc card for Asus eeepc

  1. #41
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saxappeal View Post

    If you ever think of doing a real install check this site: www(dot)i-hacked(dot)com/content/view/260/42/
    I don't see the point of a real install anymore. I've been using the usb install with changes for about a year now. It's nice to be able to just delete the changes directory and go back to stock if you really hose your system.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  2. #42
    Just burned his ISO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    I don't see the point of a real install anymore. I've been using the usb install with changes for about a year now. It's nice to be able to just delete the changes directory and go back to stock if you really hose your system.
    Well, that's well seen... But right now I prefer to work with a full linux structure, as I think I can learn the most by this way..

    Anyway.. Pendrives are so huge and cheap (sort of..) in this days that it's not that important cutting on the space..

    But I guess you're right, when I get full of undoing all the messes that sometimes happens "by hand", I will probably use a live install

  3. #43
    Junior Member lanwarrior's Avatar
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    My SDHC card shows up as sdb1 when my USB drive is also connected. Without the USB driv, my SDHC card is sda1.

    I use the USB drive to load Linux OS (BT3) since the internal SSD drive in the Eee is already running WinXP.

    I tried to do the fdisk and I keep getting this error:

    Code:
    bt ~ # fdisk /dev/sdb1
    
    Command (m for help): p
    
    Disk /dev/sdb1: 8027 MB, 8027897856 bytes
    248 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1019 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 15376 * 512 = 7872512 bytes
    
         Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1p1               1         131     1007097   83  Linux
    /dev/sdb1p2             132        1019     6826944   83  Linux
    
    Command (m for help): w
    The partition table has been altered!
    
    Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
    
    WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 22: Invalid argument.
    The kernel still uses the old table.
    The new table will be used at the next reboot.
    Syncing disks.
    In addition, when I create 2 partition, there is no /dev/sdb2. If I tried to do this:

    Code:
    bt ~ # mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb2
    mke2fs 1.39 (29-May-2006)
    Could not stat /dev/sdb2 --- No such file or directory
    
    The device apparently does not exist; did you specify it correctly?
    I suspect it has something to do with the fdisk error I got above.

  4. #44
    Just burned his ISO
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    Lanwarrior,
    What is happening in your case is that instead of your system's mounting an
    /dev/sda and /dev/sdb structure, it's mounting it as /dev/sda1 and /dev/sdb1:
    Quote Originally Posted by lanwarrior View Post
    My SDHC card shows up as sdb1 when my USB drive is also connected. Without the USB driv, my SDHC card is sda1.
    But this isn't really a problem, it's just a matter of nomenclature. So you just have to use the "names" you have.

    Next:
    I tried to do the fdisk and I keep getting this error:
    Code:
    bt ~ # fdisk /dev/sdb1
    
    Command (m for help): p
    
    Disk /dev/sdb1: 8027 MB, 8027897856 bytes
    248 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1019 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 15376 * 512 = 7872512 bytes
    
         Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1p1               1         131     1007097   83  Linux
    /dev/sdb1p2             132        1019     6826944   83  Linux
    
    Command (m for help): w
    The partition table has been altered!
    
    Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
    
    WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 22: Invalid argument.
    The kernel still uses the old table.
    The new table will be used at the next reboot.
    Syncing disks.
    About the Warning, I really think this is not an important issue, it's more a sort of notification because your new system configuration would only be ready when you'd boot (so you should do it!).
    But here is the explanation for the problems you're having:
    In addition, when I create 2 partition, there is no /dev/sdb2. If I tried to do this:

    Code:
    bt ~ # mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb2
    mke2fs 1.39 (29-May-2006)
    Could not stat /dev/sdb2 --- No such file or directory
    
    The device apparently does not exist; did you specify it correctly?
    I suspect it has something to do with the fdisk error I got above.
    You are trying to format the wrong partitions!
    After the fdisk you ended up with 2 partitions: /dev/sdb1p1 and /dev/sdb1p2! And not /dev/sdb1 and /dev/sdb2.
    So, you should be using the mkfs.ext3 or mke2fs command with the assigned partitions. What I really don't understand is why are you making 2 Linux partitions. Are you going for a real installation? If no, you should have 1 fat32 for boot and 1 ext2/3 for changes! Example:
    Code:
    mkdosfs -F 32 /dev/sdb1p1
    mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1p2

  5. #45
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    By the way, if you want to format the 1st partition with fat32, you should 1st assign it like that with fdisk. In this case, inside fdisk:
    Quote Originally Posted by lanwarrior View Post
    Code:
    bt ~ # fdisk /dev/sdb1
    
    Command (m for help): p
    
    Disk /dev/sdb1: 8027 MB, 8027897856 bytes
    248 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1019 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 15376 * 512 = 7872512 bytes
    
         Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1p1               1         131     1007097   83  Linux
    /dev/sdb1p2             132        1019     6826944   83  Linux
    
    Command (m for help):
    You should press the key assigned for changing Id (I think it's t), select your partition (for example, pressing 1) and then change to the id corresponding to FAT32 (pressing b, I think..)
    Next, just press w, unmount, and format with FAT32!

  6. #46
    banana88
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    Hi and thanks for a great tutorial

    thanks man

  7. #47
    Just burned his ISO dxi5t's Avatar
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    Excellent TUT pureh@te thanks. I was battling with the whole install to SDHC card with save changes for around a week until I found this thread! Good on you!

    I did have problems with the "changes" entry as I wasn't sure I had entered it in the right place, but the thread further on showing where it should go helped - once I did that, it all worked fine!!!!

    wHIZz

  8. #48
    Junior Member lanwarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saxappeal View Post
    Lanwarrior,
    What is happening in your case is that instead of your system's mounting an
    /dev/sda and /dev/sdb structure, it's mounting it as /dev/sda1 and /dev/sdb1:

    But this isn't really a problem, it's just a matter of nomenclature. So you just have to use the "names" you have.

    You are trying to format the wrong partitions!
    After the fdisk you ended up with 2 partitions: /dev/sdb1p1 and /dev/sdb1p2! And not /dev/sdb1 and /dev/sdb2.
    So, you should be using the mkfs.ext3 or mke2fs command with the assigned partitions. What I really don't understand is why are you making 2 Linux partitions. Are you going for a real installation? If no, you should have 1 fat32 for boot and 1 ext2/3 for changes! Example:
    Code:
    mkdosfs -F 32 /dev/sdb1p1
    mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1p2
    Hi Saxappeal,

    I tried the correct partition name but it complains that it couldn't find it as below:

    NOTE: sdb1 is the SDHC card which I want to install BT3, sda1 is the USB drive containing BT3.

    Code:
    bt ~ # df -h
    Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    aufs                  1.2G   11M  1.2G   1% /
    /dev/hdc1             3.8G  2.4G  1.4G  63% /mnt/hdc1
    /dev/hdd1              16G  3.1G   13G  21% /mnt/hdd1
    /dev/sda1             3.8G  3.8G  3.4M 100% /mnt/sda1
    /dev/sdb1             7.5G  4.0K  7.5G   1% /mnt/sdb1
    bt ~ # fdisk /dev/sdb1
    
    Command (m for help): p
    
    Disk /dev/sdb1: 8027 MB, 8027897856 bytes
    248 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1019 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 15376 * 512 = 7872512 bytes
    
         Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1p1               1         131     1007097    b  W95 FAT32
    /dev/sdb1p2             132        1019     6826944   83  Linux
    
    Command (m for help): q
    
    bt ~ # mkdosfs -F 32 /dev/sdb1p1
    mkdosfs 2.11 (12 Mar 2005)
    /dev/sdb1p1: No such file or directory
    
    bt ~ # mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1p2
    mke2fs 1.39 (29-May-2006)
    Could not stat /dev/sdb1p2 --- No such file or directory
    
    The device apparently does not exist; did you specify it correctly?
    bt ~ # umount /dev/sdb1
    
    bt ~ # mkdosfs -F 32 /dev/sdb1p1
    mkdosfs 2.11 (12 Mar 2005)
    /dev/sdb1p1: No such file or directory
    bt ~ #

  9. #49
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lanwarrior View Post
    Hi Saxappeal,

    I tried the correct partition name but it complains that it couldn't find it as below:

    NOTE: sdb1 is the SDHC card which I want to install BT3, sda1 is the USB drive containing BT3.

    Code:
    bt ~ # df -h
    Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    aufs                  1.2G   11M  1.2G   1% /
    /dev/hdc1             3.8G  2.4G  1.4G  63% /mnt/hdc1
    /dev/hdd1              16G  3.1G   13G  21% /mnt/hdd1
    /dev/sda1             3.8G  3.8G  3.4M 100% /mnt/sda1
    /dev/sdb1             7.5G  4.0K  7.5G   1% /mnt/sdb1
    bt ~ # fdisk /dev/sdb1
    
    Command (m for help): p
    
    Disk /dev/sdb1: 8027 MB, 8027897856 bytes
    248 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1019 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 15376 * 512 = 7872512 bytes
    
         Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1p1               1         131     1007097    b  W95 FAT32
    /dev/sdb1p2             132        1019     6826944   83  Linux
    
    Command (m for help): q
    
    bt ~ # mkdosfs -F 32 /dev/sdb1p1
    mkdosfs 2.11 (12 Mar 2005)
    /dev/sdb1p1: No such file or directory
    
    bt ~ # mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1p2
    mke2fs 1.39 (29-May-2006)
    Could not stat /dev/sdb1p2 --- No such file or directory
    
    The device apparently does not exist; did you specify it correctly?
    bt ~ # umount /dev/sdb1
    
    bt ~ # mkdosfs -F 32 /dev/sdb1p1
    mkdosfs 2.11 (12 Mar 2005)
    /dev/sdb1p1: No such file or directory
    bt ~ #
    The p1, p2 is a unix thing. Try sdb1 for partition 1 sdb2 for partition 2.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  10. #50
    Junior Member lanwarrior's Avatar
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    Barry,

    That's what I did, by Saxappeal said that's incorrect.

    Quote Originally Posted by Saxappeal View Post
    Lanwarrior,
    You are trying to format the wrong partitions!
    After the fdisk you ended up with 2 partitions: /dev/sdb1p1 and /dev/sdb1p2! And not /dev/sdb1 and /dev/sdb2.
    So, you should be using the mkfs.ext3 or mke2fs command with the assigned partitions. What I really don't understand is why are you making 2 Linux partitions. Are you going for a real installation? If no, you should have 1 fat32 for boot and 1 ext2/3 for changes! Example:
    Code:
    mkdosfs -F 32 /dev/sdb1p1
    mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1p2

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