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Thread: Frequency and data scanner beyond the wifi bands?

  1. #1
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    Default Frequency and data scanner beyond the wifi bands?

    It's something I've always wondered about if its possible to scan data on all frequencies th exist. It would work similar to airsnort except by alternate frequencies. Is there such a tool?

    Thx.

  2. #2
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    This is the nearest your going to get:

    DIY 2.4GHz Spectrum Analyser



    http://www.wireless.org.au/~jhecker/specan/

    Quote Originally Posted by andyem View Post
    It's something I've always wondered about if its possible to scan data on all frequencies th exist. It would work similar to airsnort except by alternate frequencies. Is there such a tool?

    Thx.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOFH139 View Post
    This is the nearest your going to get:

    DIY 2.4GHz Spectrum Analyser



    http://www.wireless.org.au/~jhecker/specan/
    Very nice. Thx

    Now its time to figure out how to get mod it into other bands.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyem View Post
    It's something I've always wondered about if its possible to scan data on all frequencies th exist. It would work similar to airsnort except by alternate frequencies. Is there such a tool?

    Thx.
    "All frequencies that exist" is an extremely wide area, since the Radio Frequency Spectrum covers ELF (Extremely Low Frequency, which is to say <1 Hz) up to visible and invisible light.

    Even if you want to scan other bands, it is mainly a hardware solution. You need to get an RF receiver that does two things:

    1) Scans the frequencies of interest, and
    2) Works with the modulation and data type of interest.

    Neither one alone will get you anything much. Only after the hardware can look at the frequencies and modulation type you want to look at, can you then parse out whatever data is being transmitted (assuming it is not encrypted) using software. Programs like Airsnort work because the hardware does most of the heavy lifting before the data gets to the computer.

    Here a simple example: the 2.4GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band (where 802.11b, g and n all live) also has other data types and modulations (FM voice, Bluetooth, medical equipment data, microwave ovens) all co-existing. An 802.11b/g unit will receive 802.11b and g traffic and see the the other signals as noise, for the simple reason they only do Complementary Code Keying (CCK) [802.11b] and Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing (OFDM) [802.11g]. You can't get voice or other data types because the hardware simply doesn't understand them.

    Also, because the actual wavelengths of different RF frequencies are physically different and have different characteristics, the receivers must physically be different. You'd need a receiver for each band, and the receiver must be able to interpret the modulation type(s) that you want to receive.

    Go out and get your Ham license, and you begin to learn the size and shape of what you are asking.
    Thorn
    Stop the TSA now! Boycott the airlines.

  5. #5
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    And when you wrap your head around that, have a look into the following:



    The idea behind scrying is to reveal hidden data - i.e. electromagnetic fields within a structure. (Like those created by a metal building/computers/etc) It does have other uses besides artistic - it can be used to analyse the 2.4ghz spectrum among other things.

    http://1010.co.uk/scrying_tech_notes.html

    http://scrying.org/doku.php

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