Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Crunch on bt3 faster than bt2?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    121

    Default Crunch on bt3 faster than bt2?

    Last night after stupidity on my part I deleted a folder containing my two large hex dictonary files i made a few months ago.

    So again I ran the old /pentest/password/crunch 8 8 1234567890abcdef &> /mnt/sdd1/8hex

    I ended up with the same as before a 37gig file full of numbers and letters but this time it seemed to finish in just over 20 minutes. I sure I remeber it taking much longer on BT2

    Im using the exact same hardware as before e6600 cpu 3gb ram sata2 sil img raid. So i was just wondering is bt3 more geared up for 64bit multi core computers or am I just dreaming?
    Don't discount Windows, I would be a poor man without it ;)

  2. #2
    Developer
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    6,124

    Default

    The newer kernel probably has something to do with it.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    121

    Default

    well the proof of the pudding is in the eating so the newer kernel must have the right ingredients. ( i have no idea what the kernel is please don't hate me )
    Don't discount Windows, I would be a poor man without it ;)

  4. #4
    Developer
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    6,124

    Default

    kernel


    DEFINITION - The kernel is the essential center of a computer operating system, the core that provides basic services for all other parts of the operating system. A synonym is nucleus. A kernel can be contrasted with a shell, the outermost part of an operating system that interacts with user commands. Kernel and shell are terms used more frequently in Unix operating systems than in IBM mainframe or Microsoft Windows systems.

    Typically, a kernel (or any comparable center of an operating system) includes an interrupt handler that handles all requests or completed I/O operations that compete for the kernel's services, a scheduler that determines which programs share the kernel's processing time in what order, and a supervisor that actually gives use of the computer to each process when it is scheduled. A kernel may also include a manager of the operating system's address spaces in memory or storage, sharing these among all components and other users of the kernel's services. A kernel's services are requested by other parts of the operating system or by application programs through a specified set of program interfaces sometimes known as system calls.

    Because the code that makes up the kernel is needed continuously, it is usually loaded into computer storage in an area that is protected so that it will not be overlaid with other less frequently used parts of the operating system.

    The kernel is not to be confused with the Basic Input/Output System (BIOS).

    Some kernels have been developed independently for use in any operating system that wants to use it. A well-known example is the Mach kernel, developed at Carnegie-Mellon University, and currently used in a version of the Linux operating system for Apple's PowerMac computers.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Thakyou for the info Pureh@ate. So yes from that I can see it's the heart and foundations of the operating system, the software behind the sleek black w.i.m.p of BT
    Don't discount Windows, I would be a poor man without it ;)

  6. #6
    Jenkem Addict imported_wyze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnyt View Post
    Thakyou for the info Pureh@ate. So yes from that I can see it's the heart and foundations of the operating system, the software behind the sleek black w.i.m.p of BT
    BTW Johny, if you want to get the kernel info quickly, you can type this command in the console:

    uname -a
    dd if=/dev/swc666 of=/dev/wyze

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Yeah taken alook at that ran uname --help to take a look at what else could be seen and yeah quite interesting. I tried it with both bt2 and bt3 and bt2 seems to be more discriptive of its self but give little info on my hardware. But its the other way round with bt3. I guess that because its still in beta stage right?
    Don't discount Windows, I would be a poor man without it ;)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •