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Thread: Poor Man's FPGA

  1. #11
    Very good friend of the forum killadaninja's Avatar
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    Default hey

    Anabolic are you hoping to do wordlist attacks with your fpga? or hash work im 99% there is no fpga capable of running external wordlist attacks the logic blocks arent built for it any way you should look at the xlinkx virtex pro

    heres a quick interesting read from wikipedia

    Applications of FPGAs include digital signal processing, software-defined radio, aerospace and defense systems, ASIC prototyping, medical imaging, computer vision, speech recognition, cryptography, bioinformatics, computer hardware emulation and a growing range of other areas. FPGAs originally began as competitors to CPLDs and competed in a similar space, that of glue logic for PCBs. As their size, capabilities, and speed increased, they began to take over larger and larger functions to the state where some are now marketed as full systems on chips (SOC).

    FPGAs especially find applications in any area or algorithm that can make use of the massive parallelism offered by their architecture. One such area is code breaking, in particular brute-force attack, of cryptographic algorithms.

    FPGAs are increasingly used in conventional High Performance Computing applications where computational kernels such as FFT or Convolution are performed on the FPGA instead of a microprocessor. The use of FPGAs for computing tasks is known as reconfigurable computing.

    The adoption of FPGAs in high performance computing is currently limited by the complexity of FPGA design compared to conventional software and the extremely long turn-around times of current design tools, where 4-8 hours wait is necessary after even minor changes to the source code.
    -ninja
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  2. #12
    Just burned his ISO dynamix's Avatar
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    you can find all the algorithms you need to crack bluetooth at openciphers project and use the FPGA recommended, the pico e-12 from h1kari's website picocomputing.com.

    openciphers.sourceforge.net/oc/btpincrack.php

  3. #13
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    Look into Nick Breese's Crackstation and the work recently done on cracking using a Playstation Three the benchmarks are impressive to say the least. The question remains, what can effectively be ported to run under SPU and speed those implementations will offer. However it is an exciting avenue opening up before us.

  4. #14
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    h*t*t*p://opencores.org/cvsweb.shtml/sha_core/

    here is the SHA1 core for a FPGA, written in VHDL... the only thing to do, is to interface the computer with the FPGA board...

    i don't have the money to do this xP

  5. #15
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    there are a few cheaper alternatives... like a CPLD... a FPGA is oversized, only to compute a few SHA1 hashes!

    I am already working on! the problem is to get a working interface to the PC...


    psi xP

  6. #16
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    Hi guys,
    I am really happy, that i found this topic. I'm also thinking about buying a cheap altera or xilinx FPGA, 'cause it will be amazing to make faster the WPA attacks.

    But i have few questions about it:
    First of all, you said, that with an FPGA you can compute rainbow/hash tables very fast. But I have already seen a presentation, that said: you only have to provide your hash, you wanna crack, and a word (randoomly generated or provided by a wordlist) for your FPGA, and it will do the rest of the work: it will make the hash, compare it to you own hash, and say, if it matches or not.
    I think, xilinx packs also a windows driver with its FPGAs, so if you buy a Starter Kit, and use the driver to communicate with the device, run the code (mentioned above) on the device, than you only have to write an algorithm, that generates words (or reads them from a wl) and send it out to your device. Abput the comparison: if it is not too complicted to code it, the FPGA should do it, if it is, than your computer should do this.

    So the task is not so easy, but managable.
    Is there any people, who wants to try to work on it?

    DOMy
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  7. #17
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    Hi. My friend's father said he could get me a free altera fpga but I was wondering if it is compatable out of the box with backtrack 4 like the pico chips are? It is really cheap compared to the pico's.

  8. #18
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    I was tempted to buy a PS3 just for MD5 hashing, but after further googling - the PS3 only does 80 million hashes a second. Breese's 2007 presentation of 1.4 billion to 1.9 billion hashes a second wasn't close to being accurate.

    The GTX 285 and 295 are your best bet in terms of hashes per dollar.

    "GTX 285 can do about 580 million MD5 hashes per second, and GTX 295 approaches one billion."
    Quote: Andrey Belenko

  9. #19
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    i believe the same company that made an aim password recovery program made a cracking tool for windows and linux that uses graphics cards, its just about as efficient and with my two spare nvidia 8600 GTs i was able to do about 2000 k/s for WPA, i would defenitely check it out, but it onyl uses 8 and 9 series gpus.

  10. #20
    Junior Member tek911's Avatar
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    Default Piping in.

    Spectre, i been off the scene for a bit but i noticed your post was recent so i thought I would point you off in the right direction in terms of GPU cracking/hash generation. Pyrit is where its at in terms of that stuff. BT4 I believe bundles that in.

    Basically ATI and NVIDIA have APIs for doing non-standard things with their video cards and some enterprising people started using it for things we're more inclined to like.

    Its got some good stats. Nothing compared to the high end pico stuff, but its something definitely worth investigating for the price. Especially now since some of the older cards are cheap, but still fairly powerful. Just search for pyrit or CUDA in the forums here and i'm sure you'll find a lot of good chatter about both, theyve been out for a while now so theres probably some good read out there.

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