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Thread: Noobish Question - Re: PSUs & SFF Sys

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    My life is this forum thorin's Avatar
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    Default Noobish Question - Re: PSUs & SFF Sys

    I've recently been considering setting up a system based around Intel's new Small Form Factor board:
    http://www.intel.com/products/mother...GLY2/index.htm

    Which lead me to the following decent looking case:
    http://www.ncix.com/products/index.p...facture=Apevia

    Which has a 420W PSU. Does that imply it's drawing 420W all the time or that the max it can provide is 420W? Is there such a thing as under-loading a modern PSU? (ie: If I only have it loaded to say 40W ...... ~20W for D201GLY2 + a drive or two, will that be an issue?)
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    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thorin View Post
    I've recently been considering setting up a system based around Intel's new Small Form Factor board:
    http://www.intel.com/products/mother...GLY2/index.htm

    Which lead me to the following decent looking case:
    http://www.ncix.com/products/index.p...facture=Apevia

    Which has a 420W PSU. Does that imply it's drawing 420W all the time or that the max it can provide is 420W? Is there such a thing as under-loading a modern PSU? (ie: If I only have it loaded to say 40W ...... ~20W for D201GLY2 + a drive or two, will that be an issue?)
    I believe that the 420W is the max that it can provide under 100% load. A good switching power supply should only supply the amount of current needed to run the current load. I believe that is the nature of a switching power supply.

    I have seen some ATX PS's that will not turn on unless they have a some sort of drive attached as the motherboard does not draw enough current to trip the softswitch inside. Those were probably cheap PS's though.
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