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Thread: Changing NTFS permissions

  1. #1
    Just burned his ISO
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    Default Changing NTFS permissions

    Here's the story:

    I was running windows xp on an 80 GB hard drive, and had my account password protected. I also had it so "My Documents" could only be accessed when logged into my account. There was a hardware failure and the computer crashed, and I took the drive out and put it into another computer. When I click on my username under "Documents and Settings" access is denied. I was able to access and view these files when booting up with backtrack 2, but everything on both drives was read-only. Is there anyway to reset the permissions on that folder so I can access/edit it and its contents in Windows 2000 (the os that's running on the other drive)?

    I have a hard drive that was in a computer that crashed. I'm not sure as to the nature of the crash, but the drive no longer boots. It was running Windows XP. My user account was password protected, and the permission was set on my files such that one could only view them from my account.

    When I moved this drive to another computer (running Windows 2000), I couldn't access my files. I can access them using Backtrack 2, but for some reason BT2 won't let me edit any files on either of my hard drives. Is there a utility in BT2 t that can remove any and all restrictions on folders on the drive that would restrict my ability to view them when normally booted?

  2. #2
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    Default hhhhmmmmmmmmmm

    well ...i am not sure ........according to my m$ training the answer is no.........so i will say yes because they say their passwords are uncrackable too but that is total BS. If you can copy the files to backtrack or any linux distro, where you are root ,then you can change the permissions and move them back to an NTFS partition, though i don't know how NTFS will behave ..........it should allow you to read and write but who knows .........windows is inconsistent if its anything.....so you can only but try i guess........just make sure you BACKUP!!!! There is probably a tool floating around for that very purpose i bet..........lucky for me most people don't know the first thing about security................ooopppssss i didn't mean that ............i didn't say that...

    i don't know you....getaway........prank poster...prank poster

    oh wait the ntfs will be read-only by default , i believe, but you could make a copy to a linux distro then copy your copy back to NTFS..........you might even be able to avoid an unnecessary backup...........i am getting dizzy

    did i just say the same thing twice.............i am post post post editing at this point and i am really dizzy
    really DIIZZZZZZYYYYYYYY......dzy...dzy...dzy

    by the way that will only work on your personal files...........if they belong too someone else ........LUNIX will know and blow up your computer....dzzzzyyyydzyddzzzyyyyddzyzyydydyyzydyd yydydzzzzyyyyy

    but wait there is more.............................

    last i looked windows didn't "recognize " linux partitions..........though they are making deals now for " interoperability" but anyway burn the files you change from linux to cd then port them to windows or windows might ruin your Lunix partition
    I like to think but the promise of easy answers is hard to pass up
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  3. #3
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by donkermazoid View Post
    Here's the story:

    I was running windows xp on an 80 GB hard drive, and had my account password protected. I also had it so "My Documents" could only be accessed when logged into my account. There was a hardware failure and the computer crashed, and I took the drive out and put it into another computer. When I click on my username under "Documents and Settings" access is denied. I was able to access and view these files when booting up with backtrack 2, but everything on both drives was read-only. Is there anyway to reset the permissions on that folder so I can access/edit it and its contents in Windows 2000 (the os that's running on the other drive)?
    Yes, if you plug it into a machine of which you have Adminstrator rights, all you have to do is Take Ownership of the folder. That will reset the permissions to the Administrator user and you'll have full access to the data.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

  4. #4
    Just burned his ISO
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    Default

    I can access them using Backtrack 2, but for some reason BT2 won't let me edit any files on either of my hard drives.
    bt2 for default mount the ntfs filesystem in read only mode, if you want modify the files you must mount the filesystem in read/write mode.
    warning the write support for ntfs filesystem in linux is not perfect, read the documentation.

  5. #5
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    Default

    This is about the best ntfs read/write project in my lowly opinion.. It also requires fuse to work. Both the projects a re available from http://www.linuxpackages.net/

  6. #6
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    http://forums.remote-exploit.org/showthread.php?t=9860

    Why are you posting pretty much the exact same thing that's already been answered?
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

  7. #7
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