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Thread: BT2 and Police

  1. #31
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    nice :P

    tbh most of our platter pieces learn how to swim in a rather unique "float test"

    i have yet to find a hdd that passes the float test

  2. #32
    Senior Member imported_spankdidly's Avatar
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    I thought Linuxbeast was banned anyway? Or was that some other beast. I can't remember all the noobs. We should create a Noob-Database to keep track of them.
    I felt like bending the bars back, and ripping out the window frames and eating them. yes, eating them! Leaping, leaping, leaping! Colonics for everyone! All right! You dumb*sses. I'm a mental patient. I'm *supposed* to act out!

  3. #33
    Senior Member DaKahuna's Avatar
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    I just personally went through the expereince where one of my guys accidently formatted the wrong hard drive when attempting to make a copy of a laptop hard drive. He overwrote and NTFS drive with EXT3. Using a couple of different programs we were able to recover 85% of the files that had been on the hard drive. There was one key file, 11MB spreadsheet, that we were not able to recover so we sent the drive off to a commerical data recovery site and they were able to successfully recover the 11 MB file and 98% of the other files on the drive from a DD image of the formatted drive. We did not even have to send the original hard drive but rather a forensically sound image.

    Now granted this was a drive that had only been issued the format command once and was aborted after about five seconds but if the data on the drive is important enough and you are willing to pay there is a possiblity that the data can be recovered.

    If you check the ShmooCon archives for 2006 and I belive also in 2007, there were some good presentations on recovery of data from damanged hard drives.

  4. #34
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mummysboy View Post
    nice :P

    tbh most of our platter pieces learn how to swim in a rather unique "float test"

    i have yet to find a hdd that passes the float test
    I still want to see what a 1oz Deer Slug would do to a drive. I have piles of drives lying around here to destroy, if I only had the time. My latest mod project has been taking much of my time.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

  5. #35
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaKahuna View Post

    Now granted this was a drive that had only been issued the format command once and was aborted after about five seconds but if the data on the drive is important enough and you are willing to pay there is a possiblity that the data can be recovered.
    Many years ago, I accidently started to format my C: from a dosprompt. Of course, I meant Format D: but oops, I hit C: I aborted the format within 15 seconds and approximately 10% complete. As far as I could tell, I did not lose any data, it booted back into Windows just fine and I used that drive until it had an actual hardware failure at least a year later.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

  6. #36
    Senior Member imported_spankdidly's Avatar
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    Working at a Techshop awhile back, we would get back laptops from the manufacturer. If the manu thought windows was the issue, they would run the restore discs over the top of everything and kill all the users data. We did LOTS of data recovery back in those days. Trying to get people to back up their stuff before they brought it in or pay for a data backup was painful.

    Also, retrieving 'ALL RECOVERABLE DATA" from a toasted hard drive can be fun sometimes. We recovered everything we could from a guy's hard drive, which included tons of Pr0n pics from probably his internet cache. Watching the guy look through all the data with his wife standing there was hilarious.

    "THIS ISN"T MY DATA!!!"
    "Well we Uh, Pulled it off your hard drive"

    We also used to get guys that would drop off their laptop with Pr0n dvd's in the drive, and then their wife would stop by later to pick up the laptop. With a little gift inside the "accessories baggy".

    "THAT IS NOT MINE! WE WOULD NEVER HAVE THAT IN OUR HOUSE"
    "Um, Ma'am, It was in your dvdrom"

    We got so many Dvd's that way. Which had already been backed up and burned of course
    I felt like bending the bars back, and ripping out the window frames and eating them. yes, eating them! Leaping, leaping, leaping! Colonics for everyone! All right! You dumb*sses. I'm a mental patient. I'm *supposed* to act out!

  7. #37
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    I might as well chime in with my 2 cents.

    I read an article a while back on how data recovery is done. The high dollar method injects a signal into the drive and reads back the signal and noise and through a lot of math you can figure out if the bit used to be a one or zero on the drive. Do it for a long enough time with sophisticated enough equipment and you can figure out what it was before that and before with some degree of certainty. How much, I don't know I'm not in that business just stating what I know to be true.

    Also, as I understand the read/write head never reads/writes the exact same spot, there's a sloppiness if you will. So, when you wipe a drive you may not wipe every spot on the drive where that bit was a 1 or 0.

    Also, it would seem to hold true that the human brain is much more capable of "connecting the dots". So, if you get most or some of the data you may be able to still figure out what it's supposed to be. Do you need all 32 bits or is the only the first few enough to reconstruct the data. Text files seem to have alot of data redundancy/uselessnes built in.

    I do believe the RAM experiment is true. It seems quite possible that RAM still holds its memory even though it doesn't have an active voltage applied. Not knowing the type of RAM involved its hard to say how it works, but perhaps the RAM doesn't automatically clear it's registers when voltage is applied. My guess is most RAM is like this in that you have to issue a command to it to zero it out. Then again zero it out might not actually zero out the data just a register that says it's got data? It seems plausible that this could be done with the Cache on the hard drive also. After all it is just memory.


    The best way to ensure the data is gone? Physically destroy the media. For the truley paranoid. Remove the circuit board, destroy it. Remove the platters, destroy them, dispose of seperately.

  8. #38
    Senior Member imported_spankdidly's Avatar
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    I also read once about the Ub3r L33t parts of the gov3rnm3nt that can drive by your house with a device that can read things from magnetic fields, or static electricty, or something weird and can view your monitor etc. I dont know if this is true, could be a consipracy theory, but then again, i wouldn't be suprised. Hell, we send people to the moon, and rovers to mars, why not right?
    I felt like bending the bars back, and ripping out the window frames and eating them. yes, eating them! Leaping, leaping, leaping! Colonics for everyone! All right! You dumb*sses. I'm a mental patient. I'm *supposed* to act out!

  9. #39
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    Let me tell you why I think that the recovery was a farce, or at the very least, a "con".

    First, there are two main types of RAM - static and dynamic. Dynamic RAM (which is the main memory type used today), once written to, has to be "refreshed" about 100 times a second. Refreshing has to occur to reinforce the rapidly discharging charge. If dynamic RAM is NOT refreshed, the charge quickly goes to zero - so any R-C time constant is relatively short. For someone to tell me that they can take a stick of dynamic RAM out of a powered off machine and stick it in their "magic machine" and actually read the data is stretching the bounds of believability.

    Static RAM, on the other hand, does not need the refresh cycles (but it does need power). It IS believable that this could have been done with static RAM, since the R-C time constant of the charges on the device could be long enough to hold the data for minutes or so. If this was actually the case, this is the reason that you don't hear anything like this happening today (since 99.99% of all RAM used today is of the dynamic variety).

    If this were truly the case that dynamic RAM would act like this, the manufactures of the devices today would be "all over it". One of the largest stumbling blocks in dynamic RAM today is the incessant need for refreshing. It costs processing speed, chip complexity and PC board area. If this requirement could be eliminated or greatly reduced, it would be in PCs today.

    AND, we have talking about electronic RAM memory, not HDD memory, which can hold data for years, and for which the only reliable way to destroy the data is to destroy the drive, and NOT flash memory, which is a type of ROM.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by spankdidly View Post
    I also read once about the Ub3r L33t parts of the gov3rnm3nt that can drive by your house with a device that can read things from magnetic fields, or static electricty, or something weird and can view your monitor etc. I dont know if this is true, could be a consipracy theory, but then again, i wouldn't be suprised. Hell, we send people to the moon, and rovers to mars, why not right?
    This is ABSOLUTELY true. They monitor the RFI generated by all of your powered equipment. An "a" entered on a computer has an RFI signature different from an "s" - in fact, each entry has a unique signature. They also can actually plug into your neighbors power grid and read the things that you type on your computer, by monitoring the power fluctuations from everything that you do electronically.

    This is why all military and spook equipment has to meet Tempest level certification (look it up).

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