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Thread: TUTORIAL: live install with changes, swap and data partitions

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  1. #1
    Developer balding_parrot's Avatar
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    Default TUTORIAL: live install with changes, swap and data partitions

    This question or a question related to part of this gets asked so many times, but people seem unable to find it where I originally posted it.

    THIS TUTORIAL IS FOR BT2 BUT CAN EASILY BE ADAPTED FOR BT3

    Most of this is aimed at a USB HDD but it should be obvious from this how to adapt it for a USB pendrive, stick, flash drive or whatever else you like to call them.


    Ok so this is how I do a live install with changes, swap and data partitions.

    You will need
    bt2final.iso md5 verified
    WinRAR any recentish version will work (free trial version is ok too)
    USB HDD size of your choice
    or a USB STICK size depending on how many of these features you want (1GB MIN for the basic live or 2GB MIN for live with changes)

    In windows right click my computer and select manage and select disk management. (for a USB STICK you will have to do this in QTparted)
    select you USB drive and delete any partitions.

    create a new Primary Partition 1-1.5 GB and format it FAT32 this extra space allows you add modules if you want to. (I like to make it 1.5GB as I like modules) I do this in windows as it seems to work better, but for USB sticks this has to be done in qtparted.

    Open the bt2final.iso in WinRAR (yes it can open iso files) and extract the iso to the new partition, you could also copy them from the cd but this metod works best for me.

    safe eject the USB HDD or Stick.

    Boot into Backtrack from the cd, login and startx

    Insert the USB HDD

    Open qtparted select you USB and create a 1GB swap primary partition (whatever size you like)

    Create a ext2 primary partition (I use 5GB you could use more or less) this is for the changes (Take note of what this drive is referenced as sda3 in my case but could be sdb3 etc)

    Create a FAT32 or ext2 primary partition for the rest of the disk (this is where you store your data) I use FAT32 so as I can add or remove files from or to it on any computer with USB (you will only be able to access this partition on a HDD install, and not on a USB stick)

    So now you should have 4 primary partitions
    1 FAT32
    2 SWAP
    3 ext2
    4 FAT32 or ext2

    Partition 1 and partition 4 (if FAT32) will need to be assigned drive letters in windows for you to be able to access them.

    Commit the changes, close qtparted and reboot into windows

    <EDIT by ziplock> in the ext2 partition, create an empty folder named Changes </edit>

    These next steps could be done in BT but I have found the last step to be unreliable.

    navigate to the boot folder on the USB HDD or USB stick and right click bootinst.bat and select edit. This opens the file in notepad for editing

    find this section
    :setupNT
    \boot\syslinux\syslinux.exe -ma -d \boot\syslinux %DISK%:
    goto setupDone

    :setup95
    \boot\syslinux\syslinux.com -ma -d \boot\syslinux %DISK%:
    and change it too this

    :setupNT
    \boot\syslinux\syslinux.exe -ma -f -d \boot\syslinux %DISK%:
    goto setupDone

    :setup95
    \boot\syslinux\syslinux.com -ma -f -d \boot\syslinux %DISK%:
    now save it making sure that it does not get .txt added

    now open the syslinux folder and open syslinux.cfg in wordpad as notepad does not display it correctly

    Code:
    PROMPT 1
    TIMEOUT 400
    DEFAULT bt
    
    label bt
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz
    append vga=0x317 max_loop=255 initrd=/boot/initrd.gz init=linuxrc load_ramdisk=1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ramdisk_size=4444 root=/dev/ram0 rw
    
    label btsafe
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz
    append vga=769 max_loop=255 initrd=/boot/initrd.gz init=linuxrc load_ramdisk=1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ramdisk_size=4444 root=/dev/ram0 rw
    
    label memtest86
    kernel /boot/memtest86p
    and now add this changes=/dev/sda3 replacing the sda3 if necessary as noted earlier so yours will now look like this.
    PROPS TO SHAMANVIRTUEL FOR THIS DISCOVERY

    Code:
    PROMPT 1
    TIMEOUT 400
    DEFAULT bt
    
    label bt
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz
    append  changes=/dev/sda3 vga=0x317 max_loop=255 initrd=/boot/initrd.gz init=linuxrc load_ramdisk=1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ramdisk_size=4444 root=/dev/ram0 rw
    
    label btsafe
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz
    append vga=769 max_loop=255 initrd=/boot/initrd.gz init=linuxrc load_ramdisk=1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ramdisk_size=4444 root=/dev/ram0 rw
    
    label memtest86
    kernel /boot/memtest86p
    OK save that making sure that no extra extention gets added.

    Click start run and type cmd and press enter.

    at the command prompt change your new USB drive and cd /boot

    BEFORE YOU DO THE NEXT STEP MAKE SURE YOU ARE IN YOUR USB DRIVE AS WE HAVE FORCED THE INSTALLER TO WRITE TO THE MBR IF YOU ARE NOT IN THE USB DRIVE YOU WILL SCREW UP YOUR SYSTEM.
    CONSIDER THIS YOUR WARNING NOT TO DO THIS IF YOU ARE UNSURE
    I ACCEPT NO RESPONSIBILITY IF YOU MESS THINGS UP



    Ok so you are feeling brave... good

    type
    Code:
    bootinst.bat
    and follow the instructions making sure that it has got the drive letter correct.

    reboot making sure to setup your bios to boot from the USB or EXTERNAL DRIVE or REMOVABLE DRIVE as the first boot device.

    Once you have booted into BT make sure to turn the swap partition on.
    This shouldn't be necessary, but do it just in case.
    The second command will probably tell you that it is in use or busy, but you can ignore that as it is only telling you that BT has already worked it out and is using it.

    Code:
    mkswap /dev/sda2
    swapon /dev/sda2
    THAT'S IT

    There you go, the best install option in my opinion. all the benefits of a live install (easy use of modules) all the benefits of a disk swap space, all the benefits of a full install (changes saved automatically) and a partition to store data on.
    Plus if you do manage to mess your install up, just delete the folders in the changes partition and you are back to a virgin install. And if you think that installing some piece of software or making some changes to your install may cause a problem, you can make a copy of those same two folders, as a backup just in case.

    This is the method I use all the time, and as far as I am concerned the best way of installing BT

    Sorry this is a bit rough and ready, it was only written very quickly.

    GOOD LUCK and enjoy

    As a side note if you need to use a bootcode like irqpoll or acpi=off etc you can put it after the append mentioned earlier, you can also use multiple bootcodes if needed by putting a space between them.

  2. #2
    Senior Member shamanvirtuel's Avatar
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    just a little thing... -f is needed only for HarDrive not for keys....
    Watch your back, your packetz will belong to me soon... xD

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  3. #3
    Developer balding_parrot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shamanvirtuel View Post
    just a little thing... -f is needed only for HarDrive not for keys....
    Your right, but I added it as I said most of this is aimed at a HDD install, and it wouldn't make any difference if used on a key.

    But thanks for making a very valid point.

  4. #4
    Senior Member shamanvirtuel's Avatar
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    yes you're right it don't hurt nobody if it's here....

    BTW i got now a dual bootable 250 WD (BT2 live and Ubuntu Server) with 8 partition (only 4 primary) ....i will be able to have a big hash table...

    LOL i think im reaching the end of what is useful for use BT
    Watch your back, your packetz will belong to me soon... xD

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  5. #5
    Developer balding_parrot's Avatar
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    If it's a 2 1/2" one I bet that wasn't cheap.

    I have about 45GB of hash tables for WPA alone but I have quickly found that even that has serious limitations

    Oh well I do have over 150million word password lists, so they will help, even though that has it's own obvious limitations too.

  6. #6
    Senior Member shamanvirtuel's Avatar
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    it's a 2.5 .... yes not so expensive....

    http://www.westerndigital.com/en/pro...sp?DriveID=317

    200 $
    Watch your back, your packetz will belong to me soon... xD

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  7. #7
    Just burned his ISO
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    Good morning!

    I tried your method.
    Now, I am able to boot from my USB Stick.

    But I have 4 more Questions, maybe you can help me?!


    1.

    now open the syslinux folder and open syslinux.cfg in wordpad as notepad does not display it correctly

    -- after changing the text in syslinux.cfg i only can save it, as a text document. The symbol changed to the symbol of wordpad, cause i opened it with this programm.
    But if i go on this symbol there is written that`s still a *.cfg -file. So it seems to be ok? OR


    Could this be a problem?

    2.

    I have problems with the last step.

    I write: mkswap /dev//sda2
    The system response: Setting up swapspace version 1, size = 1044602 kB
    no label, UUID ,,,,, etc
    ( That seems to be ok)

    But then i type:

    swapon: dev/sda2/

    and now the System responses:

    swapon: dev/sda2: Device or resource busy ...

    WHATS wrong in this case ;-((
    Could this be a problem?


    I tested netmonitor modus/ airodump and aireplay injection and it was all ok.



    3.

    When i install new programms like aicrack new version, maybe wesside-ng, airraid etc..

    one time i install it,is it installed even when i start next time booting? Or have i type "make" "make install" again and again?

    4.

    I did it like you said i formatted the last partition (4) to Fat32 maybe to store some stuff on it when i am using windows.

    But with windows i only have access to the first fat 32 partition.
    I can see this partition with paragon but i dont know the option i have to do.

    It seems so that i can give this partition a new "in germany we say Laufwerksbuchstaben" like E: or J: but maybe this can make trouble with backtrack??


    ps: while installing the partitions with qtparted i choose always the first point (i dont know what it was called; the other point was something like "extended partition" . I hope this is ok?!

  8. #8
    Senior Member shamanvirtuel's Avatar
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    remove the // in your mkswap command and put / only

    the rest of your questions are widely covered here....search...
    Watch your back, your packetz will belong to me soon... xD

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  9. #9
    Developer balding_parrot's Avatar
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    As you have been able to boot from it I would say that none of that was a problem.

    1. change you display properties to not hide extensions for known extensions, and you will be able to see what the extension is.

    2. backtrack should pick up that there is a swap partition and use it automatically, that step is only a precaution. You can test this by running leetmode which will show you how much swapspace you have, if you don't want leetmode running you can run exit leetmode to close it.

    3. that is the point of this type of install, it saves your changes so you don't have to do that every time.

    4. That is because you have installed to a USB stick, and the problems windows has with more than one partition on a USB stick. And changing the drive letter in windows shouldn't make any difference to backtrack. This was one reason that I said that most of this applies to a USB HDD install.


    Hope that helps

  10. #10
    Just burned his ISO
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    Default noobish doubt

    Quote Originally Posted by balding_parrot View Post
    There you go, the best install option in my opinion. all the benefits of a live install (easy use of modules) all the benefits of a disk swap space, all the benefits of a full install (changes saved automatically) and a partition to store data on.
    Plus if you do manage to mess your install up, just delete the folders in the changes partition and you are back to a virgin install. And if you think that installing some piece of software or making some changes to your install may cause a problem, you can make a copy of those same two folders, as a backup just in case.
    Pls cud you clear a doubt of mine, when you say benefits of a full install (changes saved automatically), you mean that if I install a new program it will have to be saved on the 3rd partition or do you mean that any settings such as inittab,lilo.conf or something else when changed will appear in this partition?

    If I understood your original post, the first fat32 partition will be used to store BT2 and its modules and all future modules and programs. The 4th partition will be used for storing all user files so what is the 3rd partition for??

    Hope I dont sound too dum, I'm new @ linux, pls help me out.

    P.S : Is it possible to do a full(2.7gig) install of BT2 on an external USB hard disk? If yes pointers pls...

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