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Thread: How to: Compile a new Kernel & Install Xorg 7.2

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  1. #1
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    Default How to: Compile a new Kernel & Install Xorg 7.2

    ******************
    Disclaimer: Remote-Exploit nor myself take any responsibility for any damage caused to your system by following this guide. Use at your own risk
    ******************


    I've received a lot of PMs and seen a decent amount of threads about people looking to compile the latest kernel and I've recently done this in BT2 as well as installed Xorg 7.2. I thought I'd share my experience and lend some help to people who may be thinking about doing the same thing. If you find any problems or mistakes please send me a PM and I will update immediately.

    ******************
    Compiling and installing the Kernel:
    ******************

    1. Before you do any kind of such work, have a backup of everything.

    2. Obtain the kernel you wish to compile: ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/ for me this was 2.6.21.4 this was key for getting my 965GM video card working correctly.

    3.
    Code:
    cd to /usr/src
    4.
    Code:
    wget ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v2.6/linux-2.6.XX.XX.tar.gz
    5. Edit your lilo.conf config, make the following changes:

    Code:
    image = /boot/vmlinuz.old
    label = OldKernel
    6. Next open up

    Code:
    /usr/src/linux/Makefile
    Uncomment the line...
    #export INSTALL_PATH=/boot
    7. Then cd back to where you downloaded the new kernel too and

    Code:
    tar zxf linux-2.6.XX.XX.tar.gz
    8. Next we create a symlink to linux from the new kernel:
    Code:
    ln -s linux-2.6.21.3 linux
    cd /usr/src/linux
    9. It's a good idea to use the configuration of your current working kernel as a basis for your new kernel. You will be editing it in a second if you nee to change anything before the install, do it then. So we copy the existing configuration to /usr/src/linux:

    Code:
    make clean && make mrproper
    cp /boot/config-`uname -r` ./.config
    10. Now we run:

    Code:
    make menuconfig
    11. The kernel configuration menu will pop up, proceed to the bottom where it says:

    Code:
    Load an Alternate Configuration File
    Type:
    Code:
    .config
    12. If you happen to have the same chipset I do, this next step is imperative. Navigate to:

    Code:
    Device Driver -> Character Devices -> Scroll down to /dev/agpgart
    Press space to build this module into the kernel. It should show up as a (*) to the left of it.

    13. Exit out of everything when you're done and it will ask if you'd like to save your changes, select Yes.

    14. Now that we have everything configured let's go ahead and start to build the kernel:

    Code:
    make bzImage
    Code:
    make
    Code:
    make install
    Code:
    make modules
    Code:
    make modules_install
    This could take a while if you have a slow computer.

    15. When all is said and done check to make sure it installed the bzImage to you /boot directory and that lilo.conf was altered to reflect the new kernel compilation.

    16. Reboot and enjoy your new kernel. If something goes wrong, you can always boot back to you're old kernel and see what happened.

    ******************
    Compiling ALSA
    ******************
    "ALSA (an acronym for Advanced Linux Sound Architecture) is a Linux kernel module that replaces several different kernel drivers for sound cards with a single device driver which handles the diversity of sound cards internally. Some of the goals of the ALSA project were to support automatic configuration of sound card hardware, and graceful handling of multiple sound devices in a system, goals which it has largely met.

    1. Unpack the source:

    Code:
    bunzip2 alsa-driver* && tar -xvf alsa-driver*
    2. Change to the new directory:

    Code:
    cd alsa*
    3. Configure alsa:

    Code:
    ./configure
    4. Begin compilation:

    Code:
    make
    5. Begin install:

    Code:
    make install
    6. If your card is supported(http://www.alsa-project.org/alsa-doc/), run 'alsaconf' and follow the directions:

    Code:
    alsaconf
    Then, to configure sound and mixer options:

    Code:
    alsamixer
    ******************
    Compiling and installing the latest Xorg 7.2
    ******************

    If that's not enough for you, this guide will take you through the steps of installing the latest Xorg 7.2 server. I needed to do this as well to get my new 965GM chipset working.

    1. Uninstall you're old version of xorg (removepkg) packages are located in /var/log/packages

    2. Download the new packages. I got my packages from the pinki1 build. Don't download the auto script it will not work for you, trust me.

    3. I downloaded them all to /var/log/packages then installed them (installpkg)

    4. Add:
    Code:
    /usr/X11R7/lib to /etc/ld.so.conf
    Add /usr/X11R7/bin to the PATH variable
    Note: you can also edit /etc/profile and find the lan that says:
    Code:
    PATH="/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/X11R6/bin:/usr/local/apache/bin:/usr$
    And change X11R6 to X11R7


    5. Now is the time to install any graphic drivers if you happen to be using the lintel drivers you can find the install directions from: http://intellinuxgraphics.org/install.html and the actual drivers from: http://xorg.freedesktop.org/releases...l-2.0.0.tar.gz

    6. Change all the fontpaths in /etc/X11/xorg.conf from
    Code:
    /X11R6 to /X11R7
    7. Change your fontpaths in /etc/fonts/fonts.conf:

    Code:
    <dir>/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/TTF</dir>
    might be changed to
    <dir>/usr/X11R7/lib/X11/fonts/TTF</dir>
    8. Install these packages:
    Code:
    ftp://ftp.scarlet.be/pub/linuxpackages/Slackware-11.0/Library/libpthread-stubs/libpthread-stubs-0.1-i486-1ced.tgz
    ftp://ftp.scarlet.be/pub/linuxpackages/Slackware-11.0/X11/libxcb/libxcb-1.0-i486-1ced.tgz
    ftp://ftp.scarlet.be/pub/linuxpackages/Slackware-11.0/X11/xcb-proto/xcb-proto
    Note: Change xcb-proto to xcb-proto.tgz so you can install it:
    Code:
    mv xcb-proto xcb-proto.tgz


    9. Run /usr/X11R6/bin/fc-cache -f from root and user if you have another account.

    10. Congratulations you're now running xorg 7.2

  2. #2
    Moderator theprez98's Avatar
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    Default

    Added to Useful Howto Threads here.
    "\x74\x68\x65\x70\x72\x65\x7a\x39\x38";

  3. #3
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    Default

    Thanks for the guide. I shall try this tomorrow, as I am feeling very ill at the moment. Me and my wife are both having Flu like symptoms. Thank you very much for taking the time out to do this tutorial. I know that I myself, personally, have been waiting on this guide. Many thanks, and I plan on a very smooth transfer tomorrow with the help of this very well written tutorial. Again, MANY,MANY THANKS.
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  4. #4
    Just burned his ISO
    Join Date
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    5

    Default Problem editing Makefile.

    Having problems finding this in the Makefile.

    #export INSTALL_PATH=/boot

    I was able to find this.

    #
    # INSTALL_PATH specifies where to place the updated kernel and system map
    # images. Default is /boot, but you can set it to other values
    export INSTALL_PATH ?= /boot

    It already was uncommented... but it also has the ?

    Should the "?" be taken out?

    Thanks in advance!

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tossil View Post
    Having problems finding this in the Makefile.

    #export INSTALL_PATH=/boot

    I was able to find this.

    #
    # INSTALL_PATH specifies where to place the updated kernel and system map
    # images. Default is /boot, but you can set it to other values
    export INSTALL_PATH ?= /boot

    It already was uncommented... but it also has the ?

    Should the "?" be taken out?

    Thanks in advance!
    Yes, make the line say:

    Code:
    export INSTALL_PATH=/boot

  6. #6
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    I ve never compiled a kernal before so I'm just wondering what the advantage to doing this is. is it going to increse my prformance or does it fix bugs or what. I'm assuming bt3 will have the newest kernal so why wouldn't I wait. I'm just looking for a informative answer. Ill probably try it any way just to see how its done but if some one could give me some reasons.....

  7. #7
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    A new kernel is like a new or updated driver. I needed to update the latest kernel because it provided support for newer hardware such as video cards, wireless cards, sounds cards, whatever it may be. It also includes bug fixes and new developments. You can see exactly what was changed or added in the changelog right on kernel.org. I hope this answers your question.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by aspekt9 View Post
    A new kernel is like a new or updated driver. I needed to update the latest kernel because it provided support for newer hardware such as video cards, wireless cards, sounds cards, whatever it may be. It also includes bug fixes and new developments. You can see exactly what was changed or added in the changelog right on kernel.org. I hope this answers your question.
    Thanks it does. So if all my hardware works (except my sd card slot) should I still update the kernal in your opinion or will I not notice the difference?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by purehate View Post
    Thanks it does. So if all my hardware works (except my sd card slot) should I still update the kernal in your opinion or will I not notice the difference?
    I'd just wait until Back Track 3. I doubt you'll see any difference at all.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Added new section: ALSA Install and configuration.

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