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Thread: OT: Recommended Soldering Kit and Crimping Kit?

  1. #1
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    Talking OT: Recommended Soldering Kit and Crimping Kit?

    Anyone have any recommendations on a good soldering kit and a crimping kit?

    I've been browsing ebay but there are so many to choose from I don't know which one is worth the money.

    Thx

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyem View Post
    Anyone have any recommendations on a good soldering kit and a crimping kit?

    I've been browsing ebay but there are so many to choose from I don't know which one is worth the money.

    Thx
    Go to Radio Shack and buy a cheap 15 or 25 watt iron. Anything over that wattage and you risk frying your card! Because of the excessive heat!



    So get LOW WATTAGE...as far as a crimper...just get their standard on that comes in a kit..its a crimper/stripper combo.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xploitz View Post
    Go to Radio Shack and buy a cheap 15 or 25 watt iron. Anything over that wattage and you risk frying your card! Because of the excessive heat!



    So get LOW WATTAGE...as far as a crimper...just get their standard on that comes in a kit..its a crimper/stripper combo.
    Umm, 15 to 25 watt IRON?

    If you're going to do any serious soldering, with fine controls, DO NOT BUY FROM RADIO SHACK.

    http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...number=372-145

    Buy yourself one of these, and buy the extra tips for it.

    As far as a crimper, it would depend upon what you're crimping.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    Umm, 15 to 25 watt IRON?

    If you're going to do any serious soldering, with fine controls, DO NOT BUY FROM RADIO SHACK.
    @ streaker69:

    I looked at your link.

    """"Temperature is adjustable from 350(0)F - 850(0)F. Temperature stability +/- 10 deg. Includes 50 watt Slim Profile Iron.""""

    Why would you want ANYTHING over 25 watts and so much heat?? You know how sensitive a NICs' circuit board is with heat??? With only a 15-25 watt iron..you can very easily melt and place the solder onto any small component.

    @ andyem:

    I know what your gonna do with this. I bet your gonna buy you that airlink101 AWLC4130 we've been talking about via PM's, and solder you on 2 antenna connections.... Right. Believe me...if your using the soldering iron for this card..its' 50 Ohm feeder line is VERY tiny...you'll be glad you got that cheap 15-25 watt soldering iron from Radio Shack..

    Rule of thumb:

    You'll need no more power and heat than the job requires.

    Just because me and streaker69 disagree doesn't mean were both right or both wrong, or 1 right the other wrong....I think he's referring to soldering in general, an all purpose light/heavy duty soldering set up..and I'm talking about soldering small heat sensitive components.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member PrairieFire's Avatar
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    I am guessing these questions are something to do with another thread about your NIC and an external antenna add-on?

    The question you must ask your self when buying anything is what will you use it for? If you do not plan on doing a LOT of precise work on small boards that you need to maintain certain temperatures then I would try to stay under 100$. I have a old Weller WES51 that served me well through the years for everything I encountered but have since moved on to more expensive equipment only because the kind of stuff I am working on require it.

    *edit*
    Just noticed Streaker69's link is to the same model I was referring to. I bought mine from hmcelectronics.com for under $90 with a $20 factory rebate which they may still offer.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xploitz View Post
    @ streaker69:

    I looked at your link.

    """"Temperature is adjustable from 350(0)F - 850(0)F. Temperature stability +/- 10 deg. Includes 50 watt Slim Profile Iron.""""

    Why would you want ANYTHING over 25 watts and so much heat?? You know how sensitive a NICs' circuit board is with heat??? With only a 15-25 watt iron..you can very easily melt and place the solder onto any small component.

    @ andyem:

    I know what your gonna do with this. I bet your gonna buy you that airlink101 AWLC4130 we've been talking about via PM's, and solder you on 2 antenna connections.... Right. Believe me...if your using the soldering iron for this card..its' 50 Ohm feeder line is VERY tiny...you'll be glad you got that cheap 15-25 watt soldering iron from Radio Shack..

    Rule of thumb:

    You'll need no more power and heat than the job requires.

    Just because me and streaker69 disagree doesn't mean were both right or both wrong, or 1 right the other wrong....I think he's referring to soldering in general, an all purpose light/heavy duty soldering set up..and I'm talking about soldering small heat sensitive components.
    What I failed to mention about the Radio shack junk ones is that in my experience (which when it comes to soldering is quite extensive) is the tips are not properly isolated from the heating current, I have seen RS irons arc into the circuit board just as you're about to touch them to the board. Which is the exact same reason you should never use those "Cold Heat" irons like they show on the commercial on any type of circuitry. An iron should never pass voltage into the circuit.

    I have never seen a Weller pass voltage into the circuit. The several defense contractors that I've worked for in the past, Weller's is all they would use. We'd have them properly calibrated and tested to verify that no voltage passed from the tip to the circuit.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

  7. #7
    Senior Member PrairieFire's Avatar
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    Speaking of cold heat irons, If 4+ amps at the tip is not enough to convince people not to buy one, I have seen people light 3.6V+ LED's by using the tip. That alone was enough to convince me not to waste money on one.

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    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Another thing I neglected to mention is when you say Soldering Iron, it implies a Tip that is broad and flat. What you meant to say is Soldering Pencil, which is of course a small round or pointed tip. If you were to walk into RS and ask one of those blank faces for a Soldering Iron, they'd walk back, read the label and you'd end up with a 25W 1/4" wide tip that supplies a healthy 4amps to your circuit.

    Terminology is key to this, like so many other things.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PrairieFire View Post
    I am guessing these questions are something to do with another thread about your NIC and an external antenna add-on?

    The question you must ask your self when buying anything is what will you use it for? If you do not plan on doing a LOT of precise work on small boards that you need to maintain certain temperatures then I would try to stay under 100$. I have a old Weller WES51 that served me well through the years for everything I encountered but have since moved on to more expensive equipment only because the kind of stuff I am working on require it.

    *edit*
    Just noticed Streaker69's link is to the same model I was referring to. I bought mine from hmcelectronics.com for under $90 with a $20 factory rebate which they may still offer.
    Thank you everyone for your input, I'm very happy with all the great feedback.

    I will be using it for making antenna's:

    1) BiQuad 802.11b Antenna: http://trevormarshall.com/biquad.htm
    2) WOKTENNA: http://www.usbwifi.orcon.net.nz/
    3) 2.4Gz Helix: http://www.dxzone.com/cgi-bin/dir/jump2.cgi?ID=15279

    ALSO I will be using it for nic board work. Ie attaching wires to certain points, etc.

  10. #10
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PrairieFire View Post
    Speaking of cold heat irons, If 4+ amps at the tip is not enough to convince people not to buy one, I have seen people light 3.6V+ LED's by using the tip. That alone was enough to convince me not to waste money on one.
    I have a Cold Heat iron, and I do find it useful, but I would never use it for anything that contains any kind of circuitry. If you're soldering connectors onto the end of a wire, or splicing wire together, it works "okay", I wouldn't say it works great, but in a pinch it's useful.

    Of course, it's completely useless for any type of fine solder world, so you don't want to use it on any MW connectors, and any larger connectors like PL259 and the like, it doesn't get hot enough to make a good connection.

    IMO, it's always best to have the right tools for the job, so spending extra and getting a good solder station that's going to last you years, and buying from a company that's been around as long as Weller, means you'll always have spare parts.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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