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Thread: Dual boot Vista/Backtrack install

  1. #1
    Just burned his ISO
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    9

    Default Dual boot Vista/Backtrack install

    Hello,

    I need to do a dual boot of Linux backtrack2 and Vista - backtrack needs a swap, boot and root partition.

    Partitioning in Vista is the problem - can you only have 3 partitions and the rest logical?

    I have one partition on my laptop as some kind of configuration drive for the laptop - dont want to delete this.

    Therefore I cannot make all the partitions in Vista.


    What I am doing now is making one 40 gig partition in Vista and then trying to split it up in the backtrack install program - how is this done?

    Cheers

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    25

    Default You dont have to have 3 partitions

    Quote Originally Posted by john12312 View Post
    Hello,

    I need to do a dual boot of Linux backtrack2 and Vista - backtrack needs a swap, boot and root partition.

    Partitioning in Vista is the problem - can you only have 3 partitions and the rest logical?

    I have one partition on my laptop as some kind of configuration drive for the laptop - dont want to delete this.

    Therefore I cannot make all the partitions in Vista.


    What I am doing now is making one 40 gig partition in Vista and then trying to split it up in the backtrack install program - how is this done?

    Cheers

    You can have your vista partition /dev/hda1 and a second partition for windows /dev/hda2 and setup a boot /dev/hda3 and a backtrack partition /dev/hda4. You dont HAVE to have 3 partitions, you can do it in two and i suspect even one. Having the /boot and /swap help for optimization purposes. I currently have vista with a second NTFS partition for data storage and BT running off a /boot and /backtrack partition.

    tparnet

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,334

    Default

    I'm not sure exactly how you're going about this?
    I'm not familiar with vista - does it now have a half-decent non-destructive partition manager?

    You can have up to 4 primary partitions (iirc), then extended/logical partitions.
    You don't have to have a primary partition for *nix.

    For simplicity, if you're new to this, I would suggest getting a simple gui based non-destructive partitioning tool (i.e can re-size existing partitions without destroying data, like partition magic)
    Then, simply "shrink" your existing "c drive" by an appropriate amount to create your "unused" or "free" space on the drive.
    Make this empty space an extended partition and then create your desired new partitions within there.
    If you don't want to get too involved with optimisations, you could simply create a single partition for *nix (probably ext3) and then a small swap partition.

    There is a good guide around here somewhere (written by muts, I think).
    If you can't find it in the forums, try the web-sites (remote-exploit.org and offensive-security.com)

    One thing I have noticed is that some laptop manufacturers that use a seperate/hidden partition for doing a "factory restore" also have tools available to enable their restore program to work even when the windows partition size has changed, as some will throw a wobbly if the partition structure isn't as they expect to find it.
    Also, some provide a tool for completely removing the "factory restore" partition, to reclaim the space once you've made a "factory restore" disc set that can be used instead. This, I would assume, simply deletes the partition in the same manner as any partitioning tool.
    This factory-restore/resized-partition issue isn't very common, but it's probably worth checking your make/model as it could save you having to revert your partitioning structure if you needed to use the restore facility.

    Hope this helps!?!

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