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Thread: Installing BT2 on Macbook Pro.

  1. #1
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    Default Installing BT2 on Macbook Pro.

    I hope this is a useful tip for beginners. although I’m sure this is a redundant information for most of the users here.

    I found a lot of information on installing BT2 as dual boot on a Windows base computers, but I couldn’t find mach information on installing it on a MacBook pro. After doing a little research I found that on a Mac you have to follow the triple boot method in order to install BT2 successfully. This does NOT mean that you have to install 3 operating systems in order to run BT2, but you do have to follow this root.

    http://wiki.onmac.net/index.php/Trip...fore_you_start

    This link gives a well in-depth explanation on how to create a triple boot environment on a MacBook Pro, as well as instructions on installing a linux and OS X.


    PS. This is a very useful quote, “DO NOT PARTITION USING BOOT CAMP:” Most Mac users are drown into using boot camp for partitioning their hard drive for dual or triple boot.

    “Run the Boot Camp Assistant and create the Windows XP driver cd. Then exit Boot Camp. DO NOT PARTITION USING BOOT CAMP: you are only using Boot Camp for the drivers, not the partitioning.”

  2. #2
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    That's good information and all, but what about installing BT2 on a iBook G3? Can BT2 be installed on one of those? Recently I've been rolling around the idea of installing Ubuntu on a old iBook and thought why not install a distro I can "put to work" rather than just play with (i.e Ubuntu).

  3. #3
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    No, you can't install BT2 on an iBook. The iBooks use the PowerPC architecture, while BackTrack uses x86. You'll probably have to download a PPC-compatible Linux and tweak it to your needs.

  4. #4
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    AtheOS, did you manage to install BT2 on a MacBook Pro yourself or are you talking about how it might work?

  5. #5
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    Default Any Suggestion?

    Helo AtheOS, since you seem to have been successful at installing BT2 on a MacBook Pro, I have a question: all installations suggest to have three primary partitions available, /boot, /bt2 and the swap. After syncing rEFIt via gptsync, the MBR gives me only two. Did you then create a swapfile inside /bt2, or did you choose to have just one BT partition, then set up a lvm logical volume in order to set up the three necessary partitions inside that logical one? And if so, where can I get a little help in setting it up? Bootcamp isn't an option, unless I upgrade to Leopard, but resizing partitions via qtparted from the livecd is not a problem. A solution might be creating two partitions as /boot and /bt2, copying the files as instructed in the movie at Remote Exploit, then syncing gpt in rEFIt and creating a swap afterwards.... or am I just blabbing nonsense?

  6. #6
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    ocirne -- hopefully you get emails of when someone posts a reply becasue I 'm rpelying a month after you posted...but..... the easiest way to install BT on a MBP is to use neither Bootcamp or gparted, but to simply boot off of your Mac install disc, and click thru a few screens of the installer, but as soon as you see the menu option (in the menu bar) for Utilities, select this, and open up Disk Utitlity. Select the hard drive you wish to partition and click on the PARTITION tab. This will allow you to select whatever partition map you prefer. The key is to partition your Mac partition as whatever brand of HFS+ you want, but to format the Linux partition as "EMPTY SPACE".

    Re-install your Mac OS.on the HFS+ partition.

    Now boot into BT and install. It will recognize the "empty space" as...well, empty space, and you can place your /boot and swap and /home anywhere inside this "empty space" in whatever arrangement you want. The MBR will be written as it normally would in a Linux distribution, and will of course auto-detect the Mac partitions as well.

    In my experience, you can either use the bootloader for Linux or you can also do the hold-down-the-option-key-whilst-booting thing and get the default Mac bootloader; it even puts a little penguin by the Linux partition....so apparently Apple DOES admit that Linux exists. Fancy that.

    Hope that helps. The key is to get "empty space" onto your Linux-to-be partition. Also, Leopard eats partitions. I've had less trouble with Tiger, but either way I would install the Mac stuff first and then Linux. Linux is much nicer about the MBR and bootloader.

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