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  1. #1
    Just burned his ISO
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Default wordlist generator from bag of words

    Hello,

    I have looked into jack the ripper and crunch but haven't found a way to do this.
    And before I start thinking on coding this myself (which will take me a lot more than I foresee), maybe there is already something out there.

    I know that I've used some words in my forgotten password, the problem is I don't know which ones.
    So what I need is a program which I can define the maximum length for a valid/possible password and a file with a bag of words.



    So consider this:
    Code:
    $ cat bag_of_words.txt
     
     
     
    _
    _
    today#Today
    is#Is
    a#A
    fine#Fine
    day#Day#DAY
    You have 3 spaces, 2 underscores and words separated by a #.
    The # symbolizes a XOR. That means you will either use "today" or "Today" but never both in the same possible password.
    Also note that this is a combinatorial exercise without repetitions, that is why I put 3 spaces, because I know that at most I have used 3 spaces. This is necessary to avoid passwords like "today Today" (which would result from 2 draws).

    Possible passwords would be:
    Code:
    $ cat possible_passwords.txt
    _
    today
    ...
    Is_today
    ...
    today Day
    ...
    fineToday is_A DAY

    So it should allow:
    - setting a maximum length,
    - defining alternatives between words (the XOR), and
    - setting a password prefix or suffix.

    Any luck?

    I have finished implementing my own dictionary generator but I'm having 2 serious problems in regard to some aspects.
    Before I continue I'll leave a similar version of my custom dictionary:
    Code:
    aligator#Aligator
    eagle#Eagle
    pinguim#Pinguim#pinguim10#pinguim 10#Pinguim10#Pinguim 10
    elephant#elephantXX#elephant XX#Elephant#ElephantXX#Elephant XX
    scorpion#scorpionRED#scorpion RED#Scorpion#ScorpionRED#Scorpion RED
    big#large#small
    dead#alive
    on#On
    off#Off
     
     
     
     
     
    !
    Here you have 37 words (5 are spaces) and 15 lines. And keep in mind that the # represents a XOR (that is you can only pick one word from a single line) and that after you chose a word from a line it becomes blacklist for the rest of that password generation cycle.
    That means that you could have a passphrase with 15 words, from those possible 37.
    Now the good news is that at most I know that I've used 5 words!

    So the first problem is: how do I calculate the number of possible combinations?
    Is it: 37*36*35*34*33 = 52,307,640 ?

    The second problem... *eek*
    Is how do I make an incremental generation of passwords, since if this number is correct, I can try all possible combinations.
    I'm really having a hard time visualizing this...

    sorry, not sure if I was clear in the post above...
    I was able to implement a random method for generating possible passwords.
    But I'm just blocked at doing the incremental method.


    EDIT:
    I was able to code the incremental passphrase generator, but I'm still having some troubles calculating the number of possible combinations.
    Last edited by protoss; 05-01-2010 at 09:16 PM.

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