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Thread: How to start

  1. #1
    Just burned his ISO
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    Question How to start

    Hello, im wondering where is a good place to start for "hacking" with bt? what kind of attacks are a good starting place for noobs just starting to learn about all of this?
    Anything would help, but a list would be great so i can google the crap out of it.

    Thanks, Morpheous

  2. #2
    Super Moderator lupin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morpheous View Post
    Hello, im wondering where is a good place to start for "hacking" with bt? what kind of attacks are a good starting place for noobs just starting to learn about all of this?
    Anything would help, but a list would be great so i can google the crap out of it.

    Thanks, Morpheous
    Think of a subject you are interested in, read up about it, search for tutorials on the subject, try them out, repeat.

    There are a number of different potential topics you could read up about:
    • Wireless hacking seems to be pretty popular here, though its not my cup of tea. If that interests you start with WEP cracking then move to WPA
    • Web application hacking is interesting. Theres a page of Deliberately insecure web applications listed on the IronGeek site. Check out these apps, and Google for tutorials on each.
    • Network pen testing is good fun. Have a look at the De-ice cds and Damn Vulnerable Linux.
    • Buffer overflow exploitation. If you have a look at AnActivists Pentesting Documentation thread my last post there has some links. That thread is also a good read generally for newbies. Also check the bindshell shellcode thread in the Pentesting forum, there's a link to a bunch more references on the wiki.
    • Exploits and exploit frameworks. Check out the exploits at Milw0rm and Metasploit. Id suggest learning about buffer overflow exploits first however so you understand what your doing.


    Google any of that and you should be able to find good guides or tutorials on the subject.
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  3. #3
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    rawr, only because i got yelled at for it.

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  4. #4
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    Default Thanks

    thanks,i will be sure to google that. where do you learn to develop your own exploits? like be the discoverer of an exploit? i assume years of experience but is there anything else?

    morpheous

  5. #5
    Super Moderator lupin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morpheous View Post
    thanks,i will be sure to google that. where do you learn to develop your own exploits? like be the discoverer of an exploit? i assume years of experience but is there anything else?

    morpheous
    One common method to find buffer overflow vulnerabilities is to use a process called fuzzing, which basically involves sending lots of different sets of data (usually large amounts of it) to a program and then waiting for a crash. If a crash occurs, you have found a bug, but it may not be exploitable. To check if it is exploitable you would then examine the contents of memory and CPU registers at the time the crash occurs, usually using a debugger. This is where the "years of experience" thing comes into it. Certain types of exploitable flaws are easier to find than others - stack based buffer overflows for example have been known about for ages and they are probably the simplest type of overflow to exploit, and the simplest type to recognise in a crashed program, because the EIP return address and a large part of the stack will have been overwritten by your buffer.

    If this interests you Id start by reading about buffer overflow exploitation as I mentioned in my previous post. You're probably better off trying a few of these in applications that you know are vulnerable before you start fuzzing to find your own new vulnerabilities. Fuzzing to find new vulnerabilities is probably not a good starting activity for beginners, although fuzzing to try and discover for yourself an existing vulnerability in a particular program is probably a good thing to do in the beginning phases of your buffer overflow learning.
    Capitalisation is important. It's the difference between "Helping your brother Jack off a horse" and "Helping your brother jack off a horse".

    The Forum Rules, Forum FAQ and the BackTrack Wiki... learn them, love them, live them.

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    Moderator KMDave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zerond2exp View Post
    rawr, only because i got yelled at for it.

    1) Please refer to: Forum Rules - Read Before Posting!
    Specifically:

    Use sensible descriptive titles in your posts - not titles such as "Please Help!!" or "Need Assistance" or "what Am I Doing Wrong?" etc
    Well you've received an infraction for it. And for this post here you received another one.
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