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Thread: mrme's wpa word list

  1. #1
    Junior Member mRM3e's Avatar
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    Default mrme's wpa word list

    --------------------------
    MrMe's WPA dictionary file
    --------------------------
    This dictionary contains 155,138,721 lines
    Probably overkill for alot of you but just plain fun
    Approx compression size is 430 Mb, expanded is nearly 2Gb
    Also there are only words between 8-63 characters
    Sorted and unique for your convenience
    Great for the WPA pmk database
    Happy Hacking !

    MrMe's WPA list

    md5: f675327089c2e1040b3df372489e9d8f mrme-wpa.zip
    I feel sorry for them - those who take authority as the truth and not truth as the authority -- Zeitgeist

  2. #2
    imported_-$p!c3-
    Guest

    Default

    Thanks for sharing, mRM3e.
    Which wordlists did you compile into this one and/or where did you get it from in the first place?

    -$p!c3-

  3. #3
    Very good friend of the forum TAPE's Avatar
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    Default

    I have been wondering about something..
    Is there a reason that the sorting of the password lists are always basis the ASCII ?

    So ;

    AAA
    BBB
    CCC
    aaa
    bbb
    ccc

    Instead of ;

    AAA
    aaa
    BBB
    bbb
    CCC
    ccc

    I am assuming that this has proven to be the best way based on historical values.. but just wondering why these lists are never sorted with the -f in sort ?

  4. #4
    Very good friend of the forum Gitsnik's Avatar
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    Default

    Older password lists used to be stored most common first, and I maintain an active list of most common passwords for my own needs (WPA or otherwise). Unfortunately uniq seems to not be uniq when you run it on an unsorted list, so it's easier to "sort -u".

    FURTHER to that, most people spend their time typing "sort | uniq", so the more intriguing nuances of the sort command tend to be lost on them.

    Personally I use -r a lot because most passwords I have encountered don't start with upper case characters.
    Still not underestimating the power...

    There is no such thing as bad information - There is truth in the data, so you sift it all, even the crap stuff.

  5. #5
    Developer
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    Default

    I agree, I always sort -r my lists

    So i down loaded this list to check it out and it has quite a bit of garbage although its not to bad.

    After removing leading and trailing white spaces, all the ^M at the end of lines, all the HTML tagging and then removing all the binary data so that only the 96 US chars remain the list is a little more usable.

  6. #6
    Just burned his ISO
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pureh@te View Post
    I agree, I always sort -r my lists

    So i down loaded this list to check it out and it has quite a bit of garbage although its not to bad.

    After removing leading and trailing white spaces, all the ^M at the end of lines, all the HTML tagging and then removing all the binary data so that only the 96 US chars remain the list is a little more usable.
    Thanks for the sort -r tip. What methods were you using to remove all the garbage in this one? I'm also interested in combining other lists I have but i'm afraid of duplicates, how can I remove them?

    Thanks!

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