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Thread: Combining multiple wireless networks for doubled download speed

  1. #1
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    Default Combining multiple wireless networks for doubled download speed

    Ok so I feel that my title explains my idea very well. I've been doing some research on this topic being as me and my neighbors all have wireless routers and are interested in "pooling" our resources to come up with a faster "composite network." Well i have read several articles on this topic and I've seen people suggest alot of things. These ideas range from driver bonding (which i know 0 about) to virtual devices i.e. wireless adapters, but very few actually give any sort of instructions. Well today i ran across this post which seems to suggest that the author had achieved a higher bandwidth through combining a wired connection with a wireless connection. Did I understand this correctly? Also in his post he describes how he achieved this in ubuntu doing it in backtrack should be the same correct, and lastly does anyone know of another way to do this, assuming that the info from the link is either faulty or misinterpreted? I will further add that I'm pretty sure I will need n# of adapters to connect to n# of networks so assume That I have n# adapters.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Combining multiple wireless networks for doubled download speed

    I know you can combine a wired interface with a wireless and utilize full bandwidth with load balancing. Regarding your scenario, have you considered using routers with more than one WAN port? I'm not sure if they make them with more than 2 WANS I've never seen them...

  3. #3
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Default Re: Combining multiple wireless networks for doubled download speed

    I'm pretty sure the isp has to support this. Even if you bond the connections you're still only going to download from a single connection.

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    Moderator theprez98's Avatar
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    Default Re: Combining multiple wireless networks for doubled download speed

    I think it will also depend upon what sort of connection you have, i.e., cable, fiber. Also consider the signal losses over a distance.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Combining multiple wireless networks for doubled download speed

    This type of thing is generally done with multiple modems and multiple nics on a hardware firewall and is known as load balancing. The only way I could see it working via wifi is with multiple access points set up as repeaters to catch each wifi signal and then combine them at the firewall. I still think even if it worked it would not be much of a gain over spending a few more bucks for a better internet connection. Also just to be clear I generally steer clear of this type of question since it stinks of stealing your neighbors bandwidth to increase yours.

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    Default Re: Combining multiple wireless networks for doubled download speed

    Further, why would you use a security distro to do a simple, basic task that several other lightweight distros are capable of doing?
    thou shalt treat all computers as thou wouldst treat thyself, for thou art the creator of thine own problems.

  7. #7
    Member Mr-Protocol's Avatar
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    Default Re: Combining multiple wireless networks for doubled download speed

    I have a Cisco Aironet 1200 series Access point. It has LOTS of fun little options and I think if for say I had a bunch of open wifi around me I could do it. But this is something I am trying.

    I am using my Ubuntu desktop with 2 wireless cards (one PCI one USB) and the LAN card to try and load balance LAN and one Wireless AP. The other Wireless card is for making an Ad-Hoc to use the load balancing. Essentially it uses the Ubuntu machine as a router and it can be weighted so if one connection is much faster than the other you can weight one more than the other.
    I have yet to get this up to test it due to other stuff going on.

    Code:
    Linux Advanced Routing & Traffic Control HOWTO 
    Prev Chapter 4. Rules - routing policy database Next 
    
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    4.2. Routing for multiple uplinks/providers
    A common configuration is the following, in which there are two  
    providers that connect a  local network (or even a single 
    machine) to the big Internet. 
                                              +------------+        /
                                              |            |       |
                                +-------------+ Provider 1 +-------
            __                  |             |            |     /
        ___/  \_         +------+-------+     +------------+    |
      _/        \__      |     if1      |                      /
     /             \     |              |                      |
    | Local network -----+ Linux router |                      |  Internet
     \_           __/    |              |                      |
       \__     __/       |     if2      |                      \
          \___/          +------+-------+     +------------+    |
                                |             |            |     \
                                +-------------+ Provider 2 +-------
                                              |            |       |
                                              +------------+        \_____
     
    There are usually two questions given this setup. 
    
    4.2.1. Split access
    The first is how to route answers to packets coming in over a 
    particular provider, say Provider 1, back out again over that 
    same provider. 
    
    Let us first set some symbolical names. Let $IF1 be the name of 
    the first interface (if1 in the picture above) and $IF2 the name 
    of the second interface. Then let $IP1 be the IP address 
    associated with $IF1 and $IP2 the IP address associated with 
    $IF2. Next, let $P1 be the IP address of the gateway at Provider 
    1, and $P2 the IP address of the gateway at provider 2. Finally, 
    let $P1_NET be the IP network $P1 is in, and $P2_NET the IP 
    network $P2 is in. 
    
    One creates two additional routing tables, say T1 and T2. These 
    are added in /etc/iproute2/rt_tables. Then you set up routing in 
    these tables as follows: 
    
    	  ip route add $P1_NET dev $IF1 src $IP1 table T1
    	  ip route add default via $P1 table T1
    	  ip route add $P2_NET dev $IF2 src $IP2 table T2
    	  ip route add default via $P2 table T2
    	
     
    Nothing spectacular, just build a route to the gateway and build 
    a default route via that gateway, as you would do in the case of 
    a single upstream provider, but put the routes in a separate 
    table per provider. Note that the network route suffices, as it 
    tells you how to find any host in that network, which includes 
    the gateway, as specified above. 
    
    Next you set up the main routing table. It is a good idea to 
    route things to the direct neighbour through the interface 
    connected to that neighbour. Note the `src' arguments, they make 
    sure the right outgoing IP address is chosen. 	    
    
                ip route add $P1_NET dev $IF1 src $IP1
    	    ip route add $P2_NET dev $IF2 src $IP2
    	  
     
    Then, your  preference for default route: 	    
    
                 ip route add default via $P1
    	  
     
    Next, you set up the routing rules. These actually choose what 
    routing table to route with. You want to make sure that you 
    route out a given interface if you already have the  
    corresponding source address: 	    
    
                ip rule add from $IP1 table T1
    	    ip rule add from $IP2 table T2
    	  
     
    This set of commands makes sure all answers to traffic coming in 
    on a particular interface get answered from that interface. 
    
    Now, this is just the very basic setup. It will work for all 
    processes running on the router itself, and for the local 
    network, if it is masqueraded. If it is not, then you either have 
    IP space from both providers or you are going to want to 
    masquerade to one of the two providers. In both cases you will 
    want to add rules selecting which provider to route out from 
    based on the IP address of the machine in the local network. 
    
    4.2.2. Load balancing
    The second question is how to balance traffic going out over the 
    two providers. This is actually not hard if you already have set 
    up split access as above. 
    
    Instead of choosing one of the two providers as your default 
    route, you now set up the default route to be a multipath route. 
    In the default kernel this will balance routes over 
    the two providers. It is done as follows (once more building on 
    the example in the section on split-access): 	    
       
    ip route add default scope global nexthop via $P1 dev $IF1 weight 1 \
    	    nexthop via $P2 dev $IF2 weight 1
    	  
     
    This will balance the routes over both providers. The weight 
    parameters can be tweaked to favor one provider over the other. 
    
    Note that balancing will not be perfect, as it is route based, 
    and routes are cached. This means that routes to often-used 
    sites will always be over the same provider
    Hope you find this useful.

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