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Thread: finding where a cable is broken

  1. #31
    Senior Member Thorn's Avatar
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    I hate to drag the thread back on topic, but a solution for finding broken Cat5 cable that is much cheaper than Fluke or other fine instruments, is the D-Link WBR-1310 wireless router. The wired LAN side has a built-in test interface on the internal web page that can very accurately tell the distance to a break in a cable. It was accurate to +/-6" in my tests. The WBR-1310 can be found for less than $50. Other D-Link routers/switches may also have this capability.

    We now return to our previous talk of Tankers in High Heels*, which is already in progress...

    (*Kinda sounds like the title of a cheezy pr0n flick!)
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thorn View Post
    I hate to drag the thread back on topic, but a solution for finding broken Cat5 cable that is much cheaper than Fluke or other fine instruments, is the D-Link WBR-1310 wireless router. The wired LAN side has a built-in test interface on the internal web page that can very accurately tell the distance to a break in a cable. It was accurate to +/-6" in my tests. The WBR-1310 can be found for less than $50. Other D-Link routers/switches may also have this capability.

    We now return to our previous talk of Tankers in High Heels*, which is already in progress...

    (*Kinda sounds like the title of a cheezy pr0n flick!)
    Interesting. I didn't know some of the D-Link's had that "feature"
    Worth bearing in mind

  3. #33
    Junior Member Jac01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by archangel.amael View Post
    True indeed, but not the point(no pun intended). Having around 1500 psi on a piece of cable is a lot more stressful as opposed to having around 15-20.
    Generally speaking at least as far as my knowledge of the army and cabling goes, we never left cable on the ground, if it was buried in 2 inches of topsoil it was buried.
    My point was more along the lines of showing such a picture is more closely related with false advertisement. Now the moment that tank would have turned in the least little bit, any cable would have seen its last days.
    Absolutely,

    Although the main two reasons for liking the "tac fiber" had nothing to do with its "crush resistance" and everything to do with its puncture resistance and the "tips" if you will.

    The reason for the puncture resistance was that even if we buried them... vehicles would drive over them, and compress the dirt/stones and everything in it down onto the cable; I have personally found stones, twigs, and once, a ballpoint pen puncturing my commercial fiber runs (it also doesn't help a lot that commercial fiber is flat).

    The other reason is the way the cables are terminated. TFOCA cable is terminated by a sort of "twist together" metal plugs if you will (look at the pictures, I don't describe very well). In order to use them with commercial equipment, such as a Cisco 3550 switch, you have to use a sort of "breakout box". This was a plastic box with a TFOCA connector that was spliced into a commercial fiber patch cable, and that was plugged into a male to male fiber adapter screwed into a hole cut in the wall of the box. We connected this to the commercial equipment using a commercial fiber patch cable. The reason we liked it this way, even though it was more complicated, was that the box could be mounted onto something, and if any of the cables were yanked/pulled/tripped over ect, the commercial parts would pop out of whatever it was connected to and could be plugged back in (usually without having to replace it), the TFOCA part of the cable was much more resistant to these things and since they were "screwed" together and then mounted somewhere, much less prone to detaching.

    This made a massive difference in our workload, especially when the layouts where as such that there was a switch for about every 3-4 tents and it would have to located out in the user work space (corner of a tent) rather then in a comm closet, so it would be protected from the dust and some of the heat.
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  4. #34
    Super Moderator Archangel-Amael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jac01 View Post
    Absolutely,

    Although the main two reasons for liking the "tac fiber" had nothing to do with its "crush resistance" and everything to do with its puncture resistance and the "tips" if you will.
    Quick disconnect I believe is what you are trying to describe. Although I have seen better implementations of it.
    When we were first switching over to it, and training Soldiers in my last job there were several incidences where they would get into a vehicle ( and take off)that had several cables hooked up to outside sources, and would rip the things right apart. Now they are supposed to be better capable to handle those "get out of dodge quick" type scenarios.
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  5. #35
    Junior Member Jac01's Avatar
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    Hmm,

    It would be interesting to see what they have come up with now, as the cable that we used would do that same exact thing (rip apart) if you applied too much pressure to them.

    I guess that the best way to describe the connections that we used would be akin to a "child proof" medicine cap where you have to press down and turn to release them, although they also had a "shield" to keep the dust and dirt out that actually screwed together with threads. This did not need to be screwed together for it work however.

    I have seen this in some newer fiber connectors; the Rx and Tx pigtail connectors are rounded rather than flat/square, and have a sheath that is metal and spring loaded with a sort of L-shaped cutout that you have to press and turn on to a peg on the plug. Of course these are much smaller and much less sturdy.
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  6. #36
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jac01 View Post

    This made a massive difference in our workload, especially when the layouts where as such that there was a switch for about every 3-4 tents and it would have to located out in the user work space (corner of a tent) rather then in a comm closet, so it would be protected from the dust and some of the heat.
    Heh, or in our case, sitting on the floor under the coffee pot table....

    http://idisk.mac.com/barrywoods/Public/Hmmm.jpg
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  7. #37
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Heh, or in our case, sitting on the floor under the coffee pot table....

    http://idisk.mac.com/barrywoods/Public/Hmmm.jpg
    Ya know what's even scarier than that in the picture.

    Some of the CAT5 cables are broken out into two RJ45's.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

  8. #38
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    Ya know what's even scarier than that in the picture.

    Some of the CAT5 cables are broken out into two RJ45's.
    Works for 10Mb connections. These were for CAMS terminals. Green screen crap similar to as400.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  9. #39
    Junior Member Jac01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Heh, or in our case, sitting on the floor under the coffee pot table....

    http://idisk.mac.com/barrywoods/Public/Hmmm.jpg
    The pic that Barry posted above contains exactly the new kind of fiber connectors I was referring to.

    Thanks, Barry
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  10. #40
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jac01 View Post
    The pic that Barry posted above contains exactly the new kind of fiber connectors I was referring to.

    Thanks, Barry
    Those are ST, I have them all over my plant.

    http://www.aos-fiber.com/graphics/Ac...Connectors.jpg
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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