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Thread: Install BT3 on USB stick

  1. #1
    Just burned his ISO
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    Apr 2009
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    Default Install BT3 on USB stick

    Hi!
    Tonight was my first contact with BackTrack (and with Terminal on Mac OS X aswell to be honest). Anyways, I got the idea to install BackTrack3, the USB stick version, on, surprise surprise, a USB stick. Unfortunately I don't get it to work. This is what I have tried (multiple times actually).

    1) I downloaded the USB-version of the file and it mounted automatically.
    2) I formatted a 4 GB USB stick (actually formatted it and divided it into two partitions, 2 GB each with the names BT3 and Free).
    3) I copied the folders "BT3" and "boot" from the mounted USB version of BT3 into the partition BT3 on my USB stick.
    4) I opened Terminal and ran "cd /Volumes/BT3/boot". I am 100% positive I was in the right folder when I tried step 5.
    5) I entered "./bootinst.sh" and it said:
    "egrep: /proc/mounts: No such file or directory
    egrep: /proc/mounts: No such file or directory
    egrep: /proc/mounts: No such file or directory
    Can't find device to install to.
    Make sure you run this script from a mounted device."

    If I try just to write "bootinst.sh" without the dot slash
    (example: "name:boot NAME$ bootinst.sh")
    I get the following response:
    "-bash: bootinst.sh: command not found"

    Thing is, the device is mounted because I can see it in Finder. To be honest I don't know anything about Linux or Unix. Could anyone help me out here? I have searched and searched but haven't found anyone with this particular problem.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Default

    this is so easy with unetbootin on pc/linux. here's a somewhat comical thread created by another mac user finding themselves in the same situation and thier trials and tribulations to get an answer/ getting flamed:

    http://discussions.apple.com/thread....sageID=8380417

    bootcamp booting to xp, installing xp to pendrive, and unetbootin via wine are all suggested by thread participants. it's a pretty funny discussion to read. your answer(s) lie within it anyway.

  3. #3
    Just burned his ISO
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    Mar 2009
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    Default

    try to navigate to the folder where bootinst.sh is located. then run the command "bash bootinst.sh". if this does not work try "sudo bash bootinst.sh".

    hope that helps. you could also plug it into a windows machine or via bootcamp and run the .bat file in the same directory.

  4. #4
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Migge View Post
    Hi!
    Tonight was my first contact with BackTrack (and with Terminal on Mac OS X aswell to be honest). Anyways, I got the idea to install BackTrack3, the USB stick version, on, surprise surprise, a USB stick. Unfortunately I don't get it to work. This is what I have tried (multiple times actually).

    1) I downloaded the USB-version of the file and it mounted automatically.
    2) I formatted a 4 GB USB stick (actually formatted it and divided it into two partitions, 2 GB each with the names BT3 and Free).
    3) I copied the folders "BT3" and "boot" from the mounted USB version of BT3 into the partition BT3 on my USB stick.
    4) I opened Terminal and ran "cd /Volumes/BT3/boot". I am 100% positive I was in the right folder when I tried step 5.
    5) I entered "./bootinst.sh" and it said:
    "egrep: /proc/mounts: No such file or directory
    egrep: /proc/mounts: No such file or directory
    egrep: /proc/mounts: No such file or directory
    Can't find device to install to.
    Make sure you run this script from a mounted device."

    If I try just to write "bootinst.sh" without the dot slash
    (example: "name:boot NAME$ bootinst.sh")
    I get the following response:
    "-bash: bootinst.sh: command not found"

    Thing is, the device is mounted because I can see it in Finder. To be honest I don't know anything about Linux or Unix. Could anyone help me out here? I have searched and searched but haven't found anyone with this particular problem.
    Thanks.
    BackTrack really shouldn't be your first linux distro then. Try a full version of Ubuntu, 9.04 just came out and it's waaaay easier to install and use.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  5. #5
    My life is this forum thorin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    BackTrack really shouldn't be your first linux distro then. Try a full version of Ubuntu, 9.04 just came out and it's waaaay easier to install and use.
    Agreed. If the difference between "./bootinst.sh" and "bootinst.sh" is lost on you then Ubuntu or some generic Linux while you're getting up to speed on the OS would be a much better move.
    I'm a compulsive post editor, you might wanna wait until my post has been online for 5-10 mins before quoting it as it will likely change.

    I know I seem harsh in some of my replies. SORRY! But if you're doing something illegal or posting something that seems to be obvious BS I'm going to call you on it.

  6. #6
    Just burned his ISO
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    Apr 2009
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    Default Thanks

    Maybe I should try that Ubuntu-thing first...
    Thanks for the answers, guys.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Archangel-Amael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migge View Post
    Maybe I should try that Ubuntu-thing first...
    Thanks for the answers, guys.
    Yeah the choice is yours. You will most likely hit walls everywhere you turn with BT. You will find that there will be problems with your network card, or being able to mount something. The list goes on. But if you get a bit of experience with linux then you can always come back to BT. If you decide to stick with BT right now, not only will you find problems here and there, but you will most likely get side-tracked by all the cool little tools that it has to offer.
    Which will in turn give you problems.
    Grab ubuntu learn how to get it up and running and to do things with only the use of the command line. Connect your wireless card to the AP, move and copy files, that sort of thing.
    To be successful here you should read all of the following.
    ForumRules
    ForumFAQ
    If you are new to Back|Track
    Back|Track Wiki
    Failure to do so will probably get your threads deleted or worse.

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