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Thread: Using BT4 without being root

  1. #21
    Super Moderator lupin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterPunk View Post
    ok... bt4 is not for noobs...
    Someone even said linux itself is not 4 them.
    So ppl,... go to windows.
    Is the above reasoning a possible "result set" according to your assumptions mr admin/s?
    What?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterPunk View Post
    So a possible problem could be:
    After 20 years in windows, i m still a linux noob. How do I become an expert without passing the noob level? Yes even in linux!
    You guys... by reading most of your posts I m just start to believe that you borned Xperts?
    You cant become an expert without being a beginner first, but you can certainly be a beginner without acting like a noob.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterPunk View Post
    And at last... could someone answer the initial post!
    I did answer it - check post 8.
    Capitalisation is important. It's the difference between "Helping your brother Jack off a horse" and "Helping your brother jack off a horse".

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  2. #22
    Just burned his ISO PeterPunk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lupin View Post
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PeterPunk View Post
    ok... bt4 is not for noobs...
    Someone even said linux itself is not 4 them.
    So ppl,... go to windows.
    Is the above reasoning a possible "result set" according to your assumptions mr admin/s?
    -------
    What?
    I m just saying that you are pushing people to windows.
    but anyway... forget it


    Quote Originally Posted by lupin View Post
    What?
    You cant become an expert without being a beginner first, but you can certainly be a beginner without acting like a noob.
    ...
    ..., you may rename the "Newbie Area" section to "Beginners Area" while beginners are more... serious persons.
    ok ok!!... I get your point, to be honest.


    Quote Originally Posted by snafu View Post
    Hello,
    Cant use Synaptic package manager, it gives this warning: Failed to run synaptic as user root. Unable to copy the user's Xauthorization file.
    Mr snafu... i get a similar strange behavior when:
    1. I log in as (say) userX.
    2. I turn to root by entering "sudo -s".
    3. I enter "startx" in order to open the windows environment.
    This has the effect that some configuration files in the userX directory saved as root (owner) which is acceptable because of "sudo -s".
    4.Log off windows environment.
    5. Press CTRL+D to exit the root session. So, I suppose that you see the "$" prompt.
    6. Enter startx again.... to enter to windows as userX. Ooooops! Problem. The configuration file are not available for write acces to userX because of step 3. The are root now!

    Possible resolution:
    Try to write down the files that are referenced in every error message and then change to root again (don't even thing to ask how!) and using "chown <filename> userX userX" change the file owner back to the original. I hope that this will fix most of your "Cannot Access..." or "Cannot Write..." problems.


    Quote Originally Posted by snafu View Post
    Cant do /etc/init.d/NetworkManager start..........It gives this warning, which leads me to believe BT4 was meant as root only perhaps?: You must be root to run NetworkManager!
    Try "sudo /etc/init.d/NetworkManager start"
    sudo stands for super user do

  3. #23
    Super Moderator lupin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterPunk View Post
    I m just saying that you are pushing people to windows.
    but anyway... forget it
    The only people who would be pushed away to Windows by that are people who are already using it, or people who aren't capable of using anything else. A specialist Linux distribution like BackTrack is not suitable for anyone who cant learn on their own.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterPunk View Post
    sudo stands for super user do
    Common misunderstanding. It actually stands for "su" do, and the "su" (from the su command) stands for substitute user or switch user.

    Sudo Main Page
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Su_(Unix)
    Capitalisation is important. It's the difference between "Helping your brother Jack off a horse" and "Helping your brother jack off a horse".

    The Forum Rules, Forum FAQ and the BackTrack Wiki... learn them, love them, live them.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterPunk View Post
    I m just saying that you are pushing people to windows.
    but anyway... forget it
    I don't think it is Lupin's job to be a Linux advocate. People can use any tool they want, Windows, MacOSX, BeOS, BSD, AIX, Linux whatever.

    Backtrack is a tool. You should always use the best tool for the job at hand. backtrack is a great tool, but that does not mean it is the best tool for every job.

  5. #25
    Super Moderator lupin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Flibble View Post
    I don't think it is Lupin's job to be a Linux advocate. People can use any tool they want, Windows, MacOSX, BeOS, BSD, AIX, Linux whatever.

    Backtrack is a tool. You should always use the best tool for the job at hand. backtrack is a great tool, but that does not mean it is the best tool for every job.
    Absolutely. While I do really like Linux myself and use it extensively for pretty much all of my computing tasks (I only make occaisional use of Windows to keep my skills up), I dont recommend it for everyone. When my non technical friends ask for computer advice for example, I don't recommend they use Linux. Even though it has come a long way over the last few years, its still far from being user friendly enough for use by average users for anything beyond email, chat, basic web browsing and simple word processing/office tasks.

    The process of installing software outside of the main repository for example is too much for many users, and this is usually required to manage some basic computing tasks such as playing videos, mp3s, flash on websites, etc. Its not something that "just works" all behind a nice friendly GUI. If you are trying to do anything even a little bit complicated then use of the command line and troubleshooting of problems is part of the everyday Linux experience, and this is not something that basic computer users want.

    BackTrack is even less user friendly than a more newbie oriented distribution like Ubuntu. Its really not something that anyone should be using unless they are already familiar with Linux.
    Capitalisation is important. It's the difference between "Helping your brother Jack off a horse" and "Helping your brother jack off a horse".

    The Forum Rules, Forum FAQ and the BackTrack Wiki... learn them, love them, live them.

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