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Thread: 100% new to linux

  1. #1
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    Default 100% new to linux

    Hello all,
    well after years of hearing my friends say I should check out linux, I looked into and found something that interested me, which was the backtrack OS. I have never used linux, and I have downloaded the backtrack 4 beta version. I have a laptop that I'm sure meets the minimum requirements, it's a Acer Aspire One. I got windows xp on this, but from what I have read, I should be able to make a bootable usb device to run the linux OS on.

    Wel to my frist question, where do I start reading to learn how to install onto a usb device, and configue it to work with my wireless card/wired connection for this laptop
    second question:with the display on the Aspire One, will it work correctly with back track 4 beta, or do I need to find another laptop for use?
    And the last question, where do I look for learning on how to use linux, from what I've seen, it reminds me of dos commands... and I know you can customize the hell out of it.


    Thanks

    Andy

  2. #2
    Just burned his ISO
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    you can use unetbootin creates a bootable usb disk for u to find it just search it on google and itll be the first one

  3. #3
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sed8ted28 View Post
    Hello all,
    well after years of hearing my friends say I should check out linux, I looked into and found something that interested me, which was the backtrack OS. I have never used linux, and I have downloaded the backtrack 4 beta version. I have a laptop that I'm sure meets the minimum requirements, it's a Acer Aspire One. I got windows xp on this, but from what I have read, I should be able to make a bootable usb device to run the linux OS on.

    Wel to my frist question, where do I start reading to learn how to install onto a usb device, and configue it to work with my wireless card/wired connection for this laptop
    second question:with the display on the Aspire One, will it work correctly with back track 4 beta, or do I need to find another laptop for use?
    And the last question, where do I look for learning on how to use linux, from what I've seen, it reminds me of dos commands... and I know you can customize the hell out of it.


    Thanks

    Andy
    There's about a half dozen how-to's on this site on creating a bootable usb drive. Though honestly, BackTrack isn't really made for beginners to linux.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sed8ted28 View Post
    Hello all,
    well after years of hearing my friends say I should check out linux, I looked into and found something that interested me, which was the backtrack OS. I have never used linux, and I have downloaded the backtrack 4 beta version. I have a laptop that I'm sure meets the minimum requirements, it's a Acer Aspire One. I got windows xp on this, but from what I have read, I should be able to make a bootable usb device to run the linux OS on.

    Wel to my frist question, where do I start reading to learn how to install onto a usb device, and configue it to work with my wireless card/wired connection for this laptop
    second question:with the display on the Aspire One, will it work correctly with back track 4 beta, or do I need to find another laptop for use?
    And the last question, where do I look for learning on how to use linux, from what I've seen, it reminds me of dos commands... and I know you can customize the hell out of it.


    Thanks

    Andy
    Not trying to be a jerk, but you should probably start out with something else.

    I have always thought RedHat/Fedora to be fairly easy to use and get use to for new-to-linux users.

    BackTrack is meant for mainly for IT security personnel to use in pentests, Security Audits, etcs. And being that you are trying the beta you are destined to run into many issues.

    Since you are 100% new the first thing we should point out to you is that linux comes in many flavors (distros). Knoppix, Fedora/RedHat, Ubuntu, Slax, SUSE, Mandrake, etc. I would do some research on some of them, and stay away from asking which one you should use because you will get mixed and bias answers no matter what forum you ask on.

    Most all these distros have what is called a LiveCD version, which is a bootable CD (you can make it a bootable USB by using the tool mentioned by skitt). This liveCD will allow you to boot to the OS without a HDD install. Few things to note about this....1.) You can't retain changes most of the time without some tweaks (use google to find out what needs done for whatever flavor you pick) 2.) Be careful to not destroy your Windows install, as being new to 'nix and playing around that is a possibility.

    Sorry if I broke that down too much but you said you were new

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by sed8ted28 View Post
    Hello all,
    well after years of hearing my friends say I should check out linux, I looked into and found something that interested me, which was the backtrack OS. I have never used linux, and I have downloaded the backtrack 4 beta version. I have a laptop that I'm sure meets the minimum requirements, it's a Acer Aspire One. I got windows xp on this, but from what I have read, I should be able to make a bootable usb device to run the linux OS on.

    Wel to my frist question, where do I start reading to learn how to install onto a usb device, and configue it to work with my wireless card/wired connection for this laptop
    second question:with the display on the Aspire One, will it work correctly with back track 4 beta, or do I need to find another laptop for use?
    And the last question, where do I look for learning on how to use linux, from what I've seen, it reminds me of dos commands... and I know you can customize the hell out of it.


    Thanks

    Andy
    Your honesty at being a newbie up front is refreshing (unlike many other first time posters here). A willingness to admit you don't know something is the first step to learning it.

    I don't want to discourage you from learning Linux, but like the other posters here have mentioned, Backtrack might not be for you yet. If you are really new (and you are) you will probably have a much better time with Ubuntu, or if you plan on working in the IT industry, Red Hat.

    Backtrack is great - if you use it for what it was designed for. I use it for pentesting my customers networks, I don't use it as a regular OS otherwise. I have a MythBuntu server (a TV recording specialized version of Linux) that handles all my TV watching needs. I use Red Hat Enterprise at work... I use a customized version of Linux for managing phone calls as well. See, each version of Linux I use for a different task. There is no "right" answer for the type of Linux you use.

    However, as you have mentioned, you are brand new. Thus, I would recommend Ubuntu with the hardware you have.

    Why?

    Because you are new. You have lots to learn, and many of the things you probably want to try out you can do with Ubuntu. Plus, it is much easier to use for a beginner, and there is more support. I am not telling you straight out to give up on Backtrack, rather I am saying you might want to learn Ubuntu first, and then take a look at Backtrack after you are more experienced. You will get more out of it, and be far less frustrated.

    BTW, welcome to Linux, and I hope you like it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Flibble View Post
    Your honesty at being a newbie up front is refreshing (unlike many other first time posters here). A willingness to admit you don't know something is the first step to learning it.
    There are two of such type posts today. It is really refreshing as you stated Mr. Flibble.

    @ OP good luck with your learning.
    To be successful here you should read all of the following.
    ForumRules
    ForumFAQ
    If you are new to Back|Track
    Back|Track Wiki
    Failure to do so will probably get your threads deleted or worse.

  7. #7
    My life is this forum thorin's Avatar
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    Mr. Flibble thanks for being the voice of reason!
    I'm a compulsive post editor, you might wanna wait until my post has been online for 5-10 mins before quoting it as it will likely change.

    I know I seem harsh in some of my replies. SORRY! But if you're doing something illegal or posting something that seems to be obvious BS I'm going to call you on it.

  8. #8
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    Hello and welcome sed8ted28.

    As for taking your first steps with Linux you should consider using a virtual machine (either Vmware or the free VirtualBox).
    You won't risk to mess your current OS up and be all angry about Linux that your machine isn't working anymore.

    As recommended before you should get Ubuntu first. Install it on your virtual machine and play around with it. Read up on command line usage, since that is where the real fun begins If you hit a wall let me know, I will help you out.
    Tiocfaidh ár lá

  9. #9

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    You've got the right attitude...I hope you are ready for lots of reading, practice and frustration (I don't mean that in a bad way...learning by mistake is a powerful method)

    As posted by others, either a Virual Image or a Live CD would be the preferable method for you to start with, since these make it very difficult for you to permanently screw something up.

    You are correct in your impression that unix commands are similar to DOS commands. Learning how to do things from the linux command line, IMHO, is the best way to learn linux. The command line tools are generally the same throughout most distros (some exceptions of course), so if you learn the command line, you can, at the very least, muddle your way through any nix distro.

    HERE is a link that has a ton of command line cheat sheets that you may want to print out for reference. I also recommend that you take a look at the Linux in a Nutshell book from O'Reilly.

    Google will be your friend as you move forward in your quest for knowledge.

    I wish you luck...

  10. #10
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    I would suggest you to use a tool named Wubi (only type wubi in somewhere...)
    that thing installs you the very usefriendly Ubuntu under Windows (its a exe) without a need to format the disk drives or know anything. it uses the Windows bootloader so it wont do something like deleting win out of the mbr (master boot record (or at least i think so) you can choose if you want to start linux or Windows on startup
    I made my first steps this way. Its realy idiot proof
    mfg Azrial

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