Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: A news story of interest

  1. #1
    Senior Member SephStorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    166

    Default A news story of interest

    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/Aheadofth...=7060343&page=1

    THE BREAKDOWN:

    Lawmakers recently called for a new federal law that would require any provider of Internet access to keep records related to the identity of anyone using its computer networks -- for up to two years. That means all Internet service providers, businesses providing employees with Internet access, coffee shops and restaurants offering WiFi connections, libraries, and other Internet-enabled places would, at a minimum, be required to maintain records of who used a particular computer to access the Internet and when.

    This requirement is problematic enough, but the ambiguity of a key provision in the bill, dubbed the Internet Safety Act, which requires retention of "all records or other information pertaining to the identity of a user" -- even if that usage is temporary -- could sweep in far more sensitive information.

    Intended to help law enforcement track and prosecute criminals who use the Internet to traffic child pornography, the legislation would in effect require ISPs to keep track of anyone who uses their Internet access.

    WHAT IT MEANS FOR THE GOVERNMENT:

    Homeland Security Measures Could Be Compromised

    Data about the communication between government agencies and covert operatives who communicate over regular Internet channels would be retained, making the Internet Safety Act problematic for domestic and international security.

    That stockpile would be a goldmine for exploitation.

    At a time when recent exploits by hackers -- such as the Conficker worm that took control of at least 10 million personal computers -- have exposed the security vulnerabilities of the Internet, mandatory data retention would aggravate the risk of breaches and unauthorized use.

    Each time you sign onto to WiFi at the coffee shop, check a social networking site via a mobile phone, or sign on to send an email, your ISP and other providers would be required by the law to store information about you for at least two years to enable law enforcement -- on the off chance that you commit a specific crime -- to use legal process to identify you and track you down.

    ENFORCING CURRENT LAWS:

    We don't need mandatory data retention to effectively investigate child pornography. Under current law, any governmental department can require service providers (such as a phone company, ISP, cable company, university, etc.) to immediately preserve any relevant records on its users for up to 90 days (renewable indefinitely).

    And the law is already written in the government's favor. Law enforcement does not need a warrant and is not required to meet an evidentiary threshold in order to trigger this retention requirement.

    There are no known cases in which an ISP failed to cooperate under this law. Current law focuses data preservation requirements on criminal suspects; the proposed legislation would extend them to everyone else.

    THE HYPOCRISY:
    There are no known cases in which an ISP failed to cooperate under this law. Current law focuses data preservation requirements on criminal suspects; the proposed legislation would extend them to everyone else.

    Representative Lamar Smith, R-Texas, the author of the House version of the Internet Safety Act, implied in a Dallas Morning News editorial that a Colorado service provider's failure to keep private records on a perpetrator hindered the investigation of a young victim.

    "When investigators approached the service provider in order to match the IP address with the Internet subscriber, the provider had already purged the records," he wrote. "The rapist remains at large; the child has never been found."

    The Colorado victim's story tugs at the heartstrings, and we should all be angry that a criminal remains at large.

    However, assuming the case is the same one disclosed in media reports in 2006, Smith omits a key point. It's our understanding that the law enforcement agency in question waited four months before asking the ISP for information.

    The law already allows investigators to order providers to freeze their data even for months, to give prosecutors time to build their case, and ISPs have always responded to timely requests for assistance.

    Unfortunately, in the Colorado case, the prosecutor was too slow to act.
    "You're only smoke and mirrors..."

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    36

    Default

    nice dude...

  3. #3
    Member imported_blackfoot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    386

    Default yawn

    Yawn! BFD as they say in America.
    Lux sit

  4. #4
    Member webtrol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    113

    Default

    So would that end the StarBucks free conection?

  5. #5
    Senior Member ShadowKill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    908

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blackfoot View Post
    Yawn! BFD as they say in America.
    It is a big deal. Can you imagine the implications of a compromised ISP who just happens to have to retain every bit of session information related to it's networked users?

    Quote Originally Posted by Radar_mX View Post
    nice dude...
    Nice contribution, do try and put a bit more effort into posts next time....



    "The goal of every man should be to continue living even after he can no longer draw breath."

    ~ShadowKill

  6. #6
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,817

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blackfoot View Post
    Yawn! BFD as they say in America.
    At least we don't have cameras on every corner. Yet....
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •