Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: 802.11p - traffic generator

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Just burned his ISO
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    17

    Default 802.11p - traffic generator

    Hi

    I'm planing to do some test regarding 802.11p communication in urban environment.

    I'm setting up a simple testbed with two 802.11p host and I plan on testing radio link quality and transmission performance.

    I'm looking for a software or a suite of tools able to:
    - generates traffic with packet size and interval time configurable
    - data collection and traffic analyzer that can monitors traffic performance like throughput, %pkt-lost, jitter, latency, round trip delay, and also signal power level received.

    The main problem is the data collection and statistic presentation. I need something simple to configure and manage that can log statistic about data sent and corresponding data received on the other end.

    802.11p hosts are equipped by (light) Ubuntu 8.10 distribution

    thanks so much!

  2. #2
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,817

    Default

    So you have a license to operate on that type of equipment?
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  3. #3
    Junior Member digitalfriction's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84

    Default

    802.11p isn't that wifi in a car/vehicle? I thought this was still in testing stages, is it an official standard now 802.11p? If so, does anyone have any ideas of working distances?

  4. #4
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Virginville, BlueBall, Bird In Hand, Intercourse, Paradise, PA
    Posts
    3,535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digitalfriction View Post
    802.11p isn't that wifi in a car/vehicle? I thought this was still in testing stages, is it an official standard now 802.11p? If so, does anyone have any ideas of working distances?
    You could do what I did when he posted this, Google for 802.11p and read up on it. All the information is out there about it.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Archangel-Amael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Somewhere
    Posts
    8,012

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    You could do what I did when he posted this, Google for 802.11p and read up on it. All the information is out there about it.
    That's what I am talking about streaker69! Using some good old fashion googlefu'
    To be successful here you should read all of the following.
    ForumRules
    ForumFAQ
    If you are new to Back|Track
    Back|Track Wiki
    Failure to do so will probably get your threads deleted or worse.

  6. #6
    Junior Member digitalfriction's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    You could do what I did when he posted this, Google for 802.11p and read up on it. All the information is out there about it.
    Actually I did, (a while ago), I read quite a lot on wikipedia, A PC Magazine article, even a Youtube video of some demonstration, but I haven't seen anything mentioning working distances, admittedly I haven't read the full draft from IEEE802.org, because I am not THAT interested. I am guessing but I don't think 802.11p is intended for any real distance, more for toll booth applications, or closer range stuff. I think what I was really after was 802.16e, but again, I don't think this is actually available as a product.

    If you are interested I would like to use this to run my companies web connection out to technicians working in the surrounding area, hence why I was interested in distances, I haven't tested anything with current technology, as its really just a passing thought that keeps coming in to my mind, I posted my lame ass question because I thought the 2 people posting knew the subject and might just be able to answer off the top of their heads.
    Sorry !

  7. #7
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Virginville, BlueBall, Bird In Hand, Intercourse, Paradise, PA
    Posts
    3,535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digitalfriction View Post
    Actually I did, (a while ago), I read quite a lot on wikipedia, A PC Magazine article, even a Youtube video of some demonstration, but I haven't seen anything mentioning working distances, admittedly I haven't read the full draft from IEEE802.org, because I am not THAT interested. I am guessing but I don't think 802.11p is intended for any real distance, more for toll booth applications, or closer range stuff. I think what I was really after was 802.16e, but again, I don't think this is actually available as a product.

    If you are interested I would like to use this to run my companies web connection out to technicians working in the surrounding area, hence why I was interested in distances, I haven't tested anything with current technology, as its really just a passing thought that keeps coming in to my mind, I posted my lame ass question because I thought the 2 people posting knew the subject and might just be able to answer off the top of their heads.
    Sorry !
    You may want to work on your Google Fu'.

    Third Link from: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...earch&aq=f&oq=

    http://www.ew2007.org/papers/1569014956.pdf

    Abstract—Current research for vehicular communication is largely driven by the allocation of 75MHz spectrum in the 5.9GHz band for Dedicate Short Range Communications (DSRC) in North America. The IEEE 802.11p Physical (PHY) layer and Medium Access Control (MAC) layer that is currently under standardization aim at communication distances of up to 1000m. To achieve longer distances, multi-hop communication is needed. The number of neighbor vehicles is an important input parameter for algorithms that choose the optimal next transmitter of a multi-hop chain. In this paper we evaluate the number of potential communication partners in communication range of an IEEE 802.11p vehicular ad-hoc network including mobility effects and multi-path propagation. In addition the available communication duration is evaluated.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

  8. #8
    Just burned his ISO
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    17

    Default

    802.11p is going to be a standard! (I guess in the end of April)

    we have the minimal equipment and we are going to test its performance in real urban and suburban environment to understand its limit at high speed vehicular movement.

    We need a something to track and report status and performance of the link between the only two 802.11p hosts that we have.
    NTP synchronization protocol could be useful to match results.
    We'll use also GPS for positioning and timing.

    i would be thankful if you can suggest a suitable suit of tools!

  9. #9
    Just burned his ISO
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheMrOrange View Post
    802.11p is going to be a standard! (I guess in the end of April)

    we have the minimal equipment and we are going to test its performance in real urban and suburban environment to understand its limit at high speed vehicular movement.

    We need a something to track and report status and performance of the link between the only two 802.11p hosts that we have.
    NTP synchronization protocol could be useful to match results.
    We'll use also GPS for positioning and timing.

    i would be thankful if you can suggest a suitable suit of tools!

    Hello TheMrOrange I would be interested to conduct tests with the 802.11p protocol with Ubuntu, but do not know how to set the hosts, you could kindly tell me some useful links to do that, thank you PeppeMessoMalex.

    Sorry for bad eng

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •