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Thread: How do I get IP address information when I only have MAC address info?

  1. #11
    Moderator KMDave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pureh@te View Post
    Sure! right! We REALLY believe you. And your going to do this good service for what reason? Anyway your post just shows how little you reall know about wep attacks because IP addy's have nothing to do with it.
    Maybe the IP reveals which neighbor it is. Oh wait they are all on the same 192.168 network.

    That's strange.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KMDave View Post
    Maybe the IP reveals which neighbor it is. Oh wait they are all on the same 192.168 network.

    That's strange.
    They're all part of the global "Linksys" network where all the gateways are 192.168.1.1
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    They're all part of the global "Linksys" network where all the gateways are 192.168.1.1
    Yea, second only to "default" and exceeded only by " ".
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  4. #14
    otacon122
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    My classes for the Spring 2009 college semester are Fundamentals of Network Security and Network Infrastructure. This is why I want to learn how to use BackTrack 3 for analyzing network security.

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    Quote Originally Posted by otacon122 View Post
    My classes for the Spring 2009 college semester are Fundamentals of Network Security and Network Infrastructure. This is why I want to learn how to use BackTrack 3 for analyzing network security.
    Well you certainly putting the cart before the horse then. My suggestion is to go back to the tcp/IP 101 class and learn the difference between things like internet and intranet and then you can move on to the difference between private and public ip addys. After you learn some of those fundamental basic concepts maybe you could move into a portscan although that may be iffy. I'm not trying to be rude but being a "pen tester" is not easy, its not glamorous and its seems to be out of your league at the moment. I am a full time college student so I can safely tell you that trying to do homework before the semester even begins is not going to turn out well. Go to the class and complete the exercises the teacher gives you instead of trying to disrupt your poor neighbors internet service.

  6. #16
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by otacon122 View Post
    My classes for the Spring 2009 college semester are Fundamentals of Network Security and Network Infrastructure. This is why I want to learn how to use BackTrack 3 for analyzing network security.
    If that were true, why do you:

    Whenever I go out wardriving, the very first things I do are use MAC Changer to randomize my MAC address
    If you're just wardriving, according the actual accepted definition of Wardriving, do you feel the need to randomize your MAC address?

    If you weren't doing something wrong, there'd be no need whatsoever to randomize your MAC address, especially since Kismet is a Passive Scanner, your MAC wouldn't show up on any logs.

    So, what exactly are you doing when you "wardrive".

    Careful now, I can smell a lie like a fart in a car...
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

  7. #17
    Very good friend of the forum killadaninja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    If that were true, why do you:



    If you're just wardriving, according the actual accepted definition of Wardriving, do you feel the need to randomize your MAC address?

    If you weren't doing something wrong, there'd be no need whatsoever to randomize your MAC address, especially since Kismet is a Passive Scanner, your MAC wouldn't show up on any logs.

    So, what exactly are you doing when you "wardrive".

    Careful now, I can smell a lie like a fart in a car...

    Lol i think someones misconcieved the art of wardriving.
    Sometimes I try to fit a 16-character string into an 8–byte space, on purpose.

  8. #18
    otacon122
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    I randomize my mac address for security purposes - I am a very shy guy, and I prefer being alone, so I do whatever I can to stay hidden from the outside world unless I need to be in public for some odd reason. My network at home runs WPA2 with MAC address filtering, and I have the DMZ host running AirSnarf and AirPwn to throw out fake access points to confuse wardrivers while the real access point has its SSID broadcast disabled. I also have the wireless router set to not respond to ping commands. On the network itself, my workstations run drivers for plug-and-play hard drives that I secure physically whenever I am away from my computer; I use biometrics for authentication; and I have all the computers set to lock the account when the screensaver activates. Put in layman's terms - Paranoia-based security, even when I am wardriving I use this level of security.

    Now, to answer your question about wardriving, I define wardriving as a means to map out all the available wi-fi hotspots in a given geographical area without having to go from building to building.

  9. #19
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by killadaninja View Post
    Lol i think someones misconcieved the art of wardriving.
    Most people that aren't wardrivers have a misconceived notion of what wardriving is.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by otacon122 View Post
    I randomize my mac address for security purposes - I am a very shy guy, and I prefer being alone, so I do whatever I can to stay hidden from the outside world unless I need to be in public for some odd reason. My network at home runs WPA2 with MAC address filtering, and I have the DMZ host running AirSnarf and AirPwn to throw out fake access points to confuse wardrivers while the real access point has its SSID broadcast disabled. I also have the wireless router set to not respond to ping commands. On the network itself, my workstations run drivers for plug-and-play hard drives that I secure physically whenever I am away from my computer; I use biometrics for authentication; and I have all the computers set to lock the account when the screensaver activates. Put in layman's terms - Paranoia-based security, even when I am wardriving I use this level of security.
    One could get the impression that you have awfully lot to hide based on all of these security precautions, but as already mentioned faking your MAC address before running Kismet is completely unnecessary seeing as it is a passive sniffing, i.e. no data is being transmitted which could reveal your MAC. Also, why take all those steps to try to throw of potential wardrivers? Not to mention many of them won't really help that much I fail to see the need to keep your AP off wardrivers maps when you are using WPA2 encryption, which will make it uninteresting even for wardrivers with malicious intent?

    Quote Originally Posted by otacon122 View Post
    Now, to answer your question about wardriving, I define wardriving as a means to map out all the available wi-fi hotspots in a given geographical area without having to go from building to building.
    And how exactly does the need to know any IP addresses come into play based on this definition?
    -Monkeys are like nature's humans.

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