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Thread: Time Analysis of WPA brute-forcing

  1. #11
    Very good friend of the forum Virchanza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thorn View Post
    I guess I'm not understanding the problem. It can be a little awkward on a laptop, but other than that, it's no big deal. You just type them in.
    Let's say we have a password that contains the ASCII character represented by the decimal number 8 (decimal number 8 corresponds to the ASCII control character for "backspace").

    Now, imagine either of these scenarios:
    1) In Linux, you're at the command line and you want to specify the WPA password to a commandline program such as ifconfig.
    2) In Windows, you've got a dialog box with a text box, and you want to enter the WPA password in the textbox.

    How will you enter this character? I tried it just now in Windows by doing (Hold Alt, press 8, release Alt), but all it did was erase the character that sat behind the cursor.

    I realise you can read whatever kind of binary information you want from a file but I'm curious as to how you can enter the "backspace" character using your keyboard.

    Uh, you do know things like hex and keycodes, don't you? Both are pretty much prerequisites if you're programming in C.
    And just as an side: No knowledge of ASCII is necessary in order to program proficiently in C. Neither the 1989 nor the 1999 standard of C specify that the machine must use ASCII as its character encoding system, and neither standard acknowledges the existance of any "non-printable" characters. Both C standards specify a minimum of characters that must be supported by the machine (e.g. ABCD, abcd,!%^&), but they leave the door wide open as to what character encoding system can be used. IBM in fact used to use something different to ASCII.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Thorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Virchanza View Post
    Let's say we have a password that contains the ASCII character represented by the decimal number 8 (decimal number 8 corresponds to the ASCII control character for "backspace").

    Now, imagine either of these scenarios:
    1) In Linux, you're at the command line and you want to specify the WPA password to a commandline program such as ifconfig.
    2) In Windows, you've got a dialog box with a text box, and you want to enter the WPA password in the textbox.

    How will you enter this character? I tried it just now in Windows by doing (Hold Alt, press 8, release Alt), but all it did was erase the character that sat behind the cursor.

    I realise you can read whatever kind of binary information you want from a file but I'm curious as to how you can enter the "backspace" character using your keyboard.
    Ah, OK, I see what you're saying, although a purist might well argue that those are more a limitation of the OS I/O than anything, and don't negate the fact that the WPA key can contain those characters. In either case, if I were going to enter the "◘" (<there's a Alt-8 in between the quote marks) I'd enter it into something that would accept the character and then cut and paste.

    Quote Originally Posted by Virchanza View Post
    And just as an side: No knowledge of ASCII is necessary in order to program proficiently in C. Neither the 1989 nor the 1999 standard of C specify that the machine must use ASCII as its character encoding system, and neither standard acknowledges the existance of any "non-printable" characters. Both C standards specify a minimum of characters that must be supported by the machine (e.g. ABCD, abcd,!%^&), but they leave the door wide open as to what character encoding system can be used. IBM in fact used to use something different to ASCII.
    Agreed. I first used EBCDIC on IBM mainframes over 35 years ago. You'll also note that in the sentence you quoted, there is no mention of ASCII there, only hex and keycodes.
    Thorn
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Which is why I tell people to use an online password generator and throw the output on a usb thumb drive for cut and paste.
    Great idea. I will build a webpage that does this and record everything that is generated and save it to my password.lst
    I like the bleeding edge, but I don't like blood loss

  4. #14
    JMC31337
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    Quote Originally Posted by Virchanza View Post
    Let's say we have a password that contains the ASCII character represented by the decimal number 8 (decimal number 8 corresponds to the ASCII control character for "backspace").

    Now, imagine either of these scenarios:
    1) In Linux, you're at the command line and you want to specify the WPA password to a commandline program such as ifconfig.
    2) In Windows, you've got a dialog box with a text box, and you want to enter the WPA password in the textbox.

    How will you enter this character? I tried it just now in Windows by doing (Hold Alt, press 8, release Alt), but all it did was erase the character that sat behind the cursor.

    I realise you can read whatever kind of binary information you want from a file but I'm curious as to how you can enter the "backspace" character using your keyboard.

    And just as an side: No knowledge of ASCII is necessary in order to program proficiently in C. Neither the 1989 nor the 1999 standard of C specify that the machine must use ASCII as its character encoding system, and neither standard acknowledges the existance of any "non-printable" characters. Both C standards specify a minimum of characters that must be supported by the machine (e.g. ABCD, abcd,!%^&), but they leave the door wide open as to what character encoding system can be used. IBM in fact used to use something different to ASCII.
    Interesting, and along the same lines (not WPA password related), but when i dual boot my Back|Track w/ XP SP1, before i update to SP3 w/ the ISO, i set my machine name to "--" that way you cant network that sucker from the command line. You cant even ping a NETBIOS name of "--" must be via IP or GUI.

  5. #15
    Very good friend of the forum Virchanza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMC31337 View Post
    Interesting, and along the same lines (not WPA password related), but when i dual boot my Back|Track w/ XP SP1, before i update to SP3 w/ the ISO, i set my machine name to "--" that way you cant network that sucker from the command line. You cant even ping a NETBIOS name of "--" must be via IP or GUI.
    There used to be a time when you could do in Windows:

    md monkey
    rename monkey monkey[Alt + 255]

    Then when you went into Windows Explorer, it wasn't able to open the folder! You had to go back to DOS to change the name back.

  6. #16
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bofh28 View Post
    Great idea. I will build a webpage that does this and record everything that is generated and save it to my password.lst
    Good luck with that.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  7. #17
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    Default your calculations is totoly wrong

    you guys have to see nivida tesla powers if you have one rack of tesla super computer most difficult password not gonna takes more than 1 months and why you calculation all amean you making calculation all about we gonna found password on the end of the list. i belived once you creates 8 to 63 password list we got to be mixed well each long. than may its reduce to time and remember airolib with out airolib one tesla cpu 50 000 password /secont if you buys tesla computer its cames c1070 its came 2 cpus each 960 core amean 100 k e secont if you use airolib will be much much faster and if you have a rack of tesla not much than months i can tell you . and past 14 years computers tech grows so fast amean even one tesla gpu 250x faster than regular computer next 10 years i belived much faster computers available probably 2020 this calculations will takes less than secont you dont have to wait 722 years

  8. #18
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    Since this was bumped, I will say that you left out Moor's law so every 18 months that number will be cut in half.

    Also isn't it something like 80% of the population uses passwords with less than 20 characters? Hell look how many millions of people still use wep.
    Using backtrack for the first time is like being 10 years old again with the keys to a Ferrari.

  9. #19
    Very good friend of the forum Virchanza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by modacompany View Post
    if you have one rack of tesla super computer most difficult password not gonna takes more than 1 months and why you calculation all amean you making calculation all about we gonna found password on the end of the list

    Please slow down when you're writing, and use punctuation. Your English is OK, but you rush and it comes out sloppy. Take your time and everybody will understand you.


    one tesla cpu 50 000 password /secont if you buys tesla computer its cames c1070 its came 2 cpus each 960 core amean 100 k e secont

    So you're talking 100,000 keys a second, is that right?


    if you have a rack of tesla not much than months i can tell you . and past 14 years computers tech grows so fast amean even one tesla gpu 250x faster than regular computer next 10 years i belived much faster computers available probably 2020 this calculations will takes less than secont you dont have to wait 722 years
    I don't have a doctorate in mathematics, so please you'll have to explain to me how it comes out as months (as opposed to billions of billions of billions of billions of years).

    Ten years ago, I think we had the Pentium 1, is that right? They were around 500 MHz or so? Today we've got Quad Core's that are something like 4 GHz, that about right? That's an increase of a factor of about 32.

    So in the next ten years, let's be generous and say that the increase will be a factor of 100. How could a factor of 100 have anything more than a negligible effect on billions of billions of billions of billions of years.

    Please explain, and kindly provide me with the mathematics you use to work it out.
    Ask questions on the open forums, that way everybody benefits from the solution, and everybody can be corrected when they make mistakes. Don't send me private messages asking questions that should be asked on the open forums, I won't respond. I decline all "Friend Requests".

  10. #20
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    Hi, Virchanza.

    Can you make some calculations for me please.

    From 8 to 15 characters consisting of numbers, lower and uppercase letters.

    How many passwords creates this combination and how much GB do i need?

    Also not very important but it would be also good to know the required time to brute force all these combinations.

    Thnaks.

    BTW some time ago i tried to create a wordlist from 8 to 15 with just numbers. At 10 chars, the dictionary became 100 GB and i run out of space

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