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Thread: portable persistant changes

  1. #1
    Just burned his ISO
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    Oct 2008
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    Default portable persistant changes

    No this is not the same question posted x number of times on this forum (I've read them all).

    I have installed BT3 final on a USB stick containing 3 partitions:
    sda1: 4GB ntfs containing BT3 vmware image (in-case I don't want to boot)
    sda2: 1GB fat32 containing boot and BT3 (boot partition)
    sda3: 3GB ext2 containing the changes folder

    I have changed the bootmenu and added changes=/dev/sda3

    Now my problem is that if I boot my USB stick on certain laptops (with sata disks) the USB stick will become sdb instead of sda and the changes won't work.

    Is there any way to get past this? Can I use disk labels/id's or anything like that instead of /dev/sda?

  2. #2
    Just burned his ISO
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    1

    Default make folder

    Hi,

    This is my file syslinux:

    LABEL pchangesMy
    MENU LABEL BT3 Modo grafico con cambios persistentes SDB2
    KERNEL /boot/vmlinuz
    APPEND vga=0x317 initrd=/boot/initrd.gz ramdisk_size=6666 root=/dev/ram0 rw changes=/dev/sdb2 autoexec=xconf;kdm

    I'm install BT3 into usb storage with two partitions dev/sdb1 for system in fat32 format and dev/sdb2 with changes.

    You need a forder name "changes" into dev/sdb3

    Regards

  3. #3
    Just burned his ISO
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    Oct 2008
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    Default not the issue

    Thanks Carlitos, but that is not the problem I am having. Everything works fine as long as my USB stick gets mapped to sda or sdb all the time (depending on which I have set in the menu). The problem is that on some machines it gets mapped to sda and on some to sdb, so I would need the changes=/dev/sda3 option to not be specified to a specific mapping. It would be nice to be able to use a UUID or ext2 label instead.

    I will try to make a mountpoint on the fat32 partition by using UUID or label and see if I can get the changes to point to that mounted directory. This should work right? anyone?

  4. #4
    Developer
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    Mar 2007
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    6,126

    Default

    There is a way to make linux map your drives to a name like "drive 1" instead of sda1 or sdb1. I will try to find the document I used to do it and post it later. I know a post with a promise for help is kinda silly however I just wanted to say that this can be done.

  5. #5
    Member
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    Default

    Found the requested link in my collection (sry pureh@te )
    http://wikis.sun.com/display/BigAdmi...x+File+Systems

    The keyword is e2label:
    http://wiki.linuxquestions.org/wiki/E2label

    Have fun
    Be sensitive in choosing where you ask your question. You are likely to be ignored, or written off as a loser, if you:

    * post your question to a forum where it's off topic
    * post a very elementary question to a forum where advanced technical questions are expected, or vice-versa
    * cross-post to too many different newsgroups
    * post a personal e-mail to somebody who is neither an acquaintance of yours nor personally responsible for solving your problem

  6. #6
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Default

    Create a new syslinux menu option with the correct parameters. If the machine has sata drives then the usb drive will be different.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  7. #7
    Just burned his ISO
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    Oct 2008
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    Default udev

    I was hoping I could use the e2label and refer to the partition using /dev/disk/by-label/mylabel (which gets set up by udev) instead of /dev/sdx3, but alas that does not work either. It seems like the boot process looks for the changes folder before it goes to inittab (where udev is run).

    How exactly does the boot process work? Is there any way I could change the order of things to get udev to perform the by-label mapping before the changes folder is referenced?

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