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Thread: receiving packets 24/7

  1. #1
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    Default receiving packets 24/7

    everytime i plug my pc (running bt3 final's LiveCD) to the internet i always have these increasing received bytes with an average speed of 200 bits/s when the system is idle and nothing is running and this is happening from the 1st sec i start the OS ... im using the tool found in internet > settings > KDEmanager i guess or similar
    any ideas ?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlaX.* View Post
    everytime i plug my pc (running bt3 final's LiveCD) to the internet i always have these increasing received bytes with an average speed of 200 bits/s when the system is idle and nothing is running and this is happening from the 1st sec i start the OS ... im using the tool found in internet > settings > KDEmanager i guess or similar
    any ideas ?
    Well you could start by firing up Wireshark and sniff the traffic on the interface connected to the internet...
    dd if=/dev/swc666 of=/dev/wyze

  3. #3
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    an example of what wireshark showed:

    UDP (103 bytes) from X.229.110.113:65033 to 255.255.255.255:1211 on eth0 │


    the source is not me , its just mr X
    hundreds of these packets and from different sources that i dont have work to do with are causing my recieved packets to boost.
    doesnt this use my bandwith ? and reduce my download capacity(how much still is left for me to download out of 2G) ?

  4. #4
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    doesnt this use my bandwith ? and reduce my download capacity(how much still is left for me to download out of 2G) ?
    Why do you think we will be able to tell exactly how much of your bandwidth this traffic is eating up just by looking at one line? Also what you do not mention in your post is if the traffic is going both ways or only is incoming?

    Do you have any service that you need running on that particular port, otherwise why don't you simply block it, along with other open ports, using a firewall?
    -Monkeys are like nature's humans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by =Tron= View Post
    Why do you think we will be able to tell exactly how much of your bandwidth this traffic is eating up just by looking at one line? Also what you do not mention in your post is if the traffic is going both ways or only is incoming?

    Do you have any service that you need running on that particular port, otherwise why don't you simply block it, along with other open ports, using a firewall?
    about the bandwith.. im not asking HOW much does it use, im just asking if its uses and reduces my download capacity , by using (how much still is left for me to download out of 2G), i tried to explain what i meant by "download capacity"

    these are some examples of what wireshark is showing

    1665.083996 X.229.106.43 255.255.255.255 UDP Source port: rrac Destination port: rrac
    1665.120157 X.229.106.216 255.255.255.255 UDP Source port: 1023 Destination port: epp
    1667.778798 X.226.49.95 255.255.255.255 UDP Source port: rrac Destination port: rrac
    1646.188744 X.229.110.50 X.229.110.255 RIPv1 Response
    1633.438535 X.229.106.180 255.255.255.255 UDP Source port: 65233 Destination port: rockwell-csp3

    none these packets are intended for me the destination is different from my ip

    Any ideas of what can these be and if the affect my dl capacity and my bandwith ?

  6. #6
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    I have no idea about how much it might reduce your DL capacity or eat out of your 2Gb limit, but think the easiest way for you to assess whether it affects your speed would be to test it on www.speedtest.net or a similar service. Since I assume that you know the intended speed of your connection this would be an easy way to test it.
    -Monkeys are like nature's humans.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by =Tron= View Post
    I have no idea about how much it might reduce your DL capacity or eat out of your 2Gb limit, but think the easiest way for you to assess whether it affects your speed would be to test it on or a similar service. Since I assume that you know the intended speed of your connection this would be an easy way to test it.
    dude like lets forget bout the speed for a sec.
    do u have any idea of what might be going on here ?
    this thing is starting from the 1st sec i boot ... no arp poisonings no nothing!
    i just get these crap packets that have their destination as 255.255.255.255

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