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Thread: problem editing my kismet.conf

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  1. #1
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    Default problem editing my kismet.conf

    # Kismet config file
    # Most of the "static" configs have been moved to here -- the command line
    # config was getting way too crowded and cryptic. We want functionality,
    # not continually reading --help!

    # Version of Kismet config
    version=2007.09.R1

    # Name of server (Purely for organizational purposes)
    servername=Kismet

    # User to setid to (should be your normal user)
    suiduser=root

    # Do we try to put networkmanager to sleep? If you use NM, this is probably
    # what you want to do, so that it will leave the interfaces alone while
    # Kismet is using them. This requires DBus support!
    networkmanagersleep=true

    # Sources are defined as:
    # source=sourcetype,interface,name[,initialchannel]
    # Source types and required drivers are listed in the README under the
    # CAPTURE SOURCES section.
    # The initial channel is optional, if hopping is not enabled it can be used
    # to set the channel the interface listens on.
    # YOU MUST CHANGE THIS TO BE THE SOURCE YOU WANT TO USE
    source=none,none,addme

    # Comma-separated list of sources to enable. This is only needed if you defined


    hello there am completely new on linux!
    i don't know how to edit my kismet.conf.....
    can you please help me?

    thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    source=none,none,addme
    Replace this with your wireless card and driver information. You have not provided any information about this so I can't help you any further at this point.
    -Monkeys are like nature's humans.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Thorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by m4rio52001 View Post
    <Snipped, because we all know what a Kismet.conf file looks like.>

    hello there am completely new on linux!
    i don't know how to edit my kismet.conf.....
    can you please help me?

    thanks in advance
    What do you want to do with it? Have you read the README? (The README is available on www.kismetwireless.net) Do you know the wireless card's chipset and drivers? Do you know how to use a CLI?

    If you are completely new to Linux, the Backtrack is not not the platform you want to start learning. Backtrack is an advanced set of tools for specific users. Essentially, you don't know how to swim, you've just jumped into a deep area of the pool, and the aren't any lifeguards. Save yourself the drama, and try a package such as Ubuntu, and then come back to Backtrack when you have graduated beyond the basics.
    Thorn
    Stop the TSA now! Boycott the airlines.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thorn View Post
    If you are completely new to Linux, the Backtrack is not not the platform you want to start learning. Backtrack is an advanced set of tools for specific users. Essentially, you don't know how to swim, you've just jumped into a deep area of the pool, and the aren't any lifeguards. Save yourself the drama, and try a package such as Ubuntu, and then come back to Backtrack when you have graduated beyond the basics.
    I'd argue that alone in the deep end of the pool is the best way to learn to swim. Once I had BT3 installed as my first Linux experience, I formatted all copies of os x and windows in the house. Necessity is the mother of damn near everything. Congrats on diving in original poster-- now here's your hint:

    The publisher of the software you're using wants you to be able to use it. They really want you to figure it out, so they've written page upon page of documentation (seriously, read 'man tar' in one sitting, I dare you) to guide you. In Linux speak, readme means README, not DELETEME, as it does in English.

    PS: I'll spoil the novel that is man tar: 'tar -xvf' is all you'll care about for a long time.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aidan View Post
    I'd argue that alone in the deep end of the pool is the best way to learn to swim.
    However, there probably is a very good reason for this not being the praxis in most swimming schools, don’t you think.

    The problem with diving into the Linux world using one of the most advanced distros available is that most people will find it quite overwhelming to try to learn the basics of a completely new OS simultaneously as they are trying to get familiar with the new tools that are their main point of interest. In the end I believe that many a person will grow tired of trying to overcome the countless obstacles they will encounter and force them to give up completely.

    By starting out with a more user friendly distribution they can on the other hand ease into the Linux world and when they finally make the transition to BT they will be able to concentrate on getting familiar with the penetration testing tools instead of trying to wrap their head around how to edit a .conf file or install new drivers or dependencies.

    All of this being said, my first encounter with a Linux distribution of any kind was with Auditor from which I later on moved to BackTrack. As Aidan says this is therefore in no way an impossible route to take, but you will have to be prepared to grow a few grey hairs and do a lot of research on your own.
    -Monkeys are like nature's humans.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Thorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aidan View Post
    I'd argue that alone in the deep end of the pool is the best way to learn to swim.
    Normally, I'd agree with that assessment. However, for the normal user Back|Track is too specific to learn Linux on, as it's designed solely for pentesting and that specific setup and the tools get in the way of learning the basics someone needs to know and understand.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aidan View Post
    Once I had BT3 installed as my first Linux experience, I formatted all copies of os x and windows in the house.
    Uh. good for you, maybe. It just strikes me as a mistake with "newbie" stamped all over it.

    If you learn to drive by hoping in an M1 Abrams tank, you'll learn how to drive, and to run over things, and you may even learn how to shoot targets while driving, but you're probably not going to know much about the rules of the road, and driving in normal traffic.

    I stand by what I said: The original poster should save themselves the drama, and try a package such as Ubuntu, and then come back to Back|Track when they have graduated beyond the basics.
    Thorn
    Stop the TSA now! Boycott the airlines.

  7. #7
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    (install and launch new version of kismet) (in french):
    http://bricowifi.blogspot.com/2008/0...iguration.html

    launch in command line, if you don't modify your kismet.conf

    ex:

    airmon-ng start rt73
    kismet -c rt73,rausb0,Ralink

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