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Thread: bruteforcing wpa

  1. #1
    Just burned his ISO
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    Default bruteforcing wpa

    isnt it possible to crack the captured wpa keys with bruteforce instead of using a wordlist?
    ofc it would take a little longer time, but it would also be more accurate, ive been playing around with my wireless network, and i havent been able to crack it with wordfiles because i always use a password containing both lovercase, uppercase and numbers

    so it would be great if theres a tool trying every possible combination till it finds the right

  2. #2
    Developer balding_parrot's Avatar
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    Possible yes
    Practical no

    Just look into how many possible combinations there are and computational time and you soon see you would need thousands of years for success.

  3. #3
    Moderator theprez98's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by impulse View Post
    isnt it possible to crack the captured wpa keys with bruteforce instead of using a wordlist?
    ofc it would take a little longer time, but it would also be more accurate, ive been playing around with my wireless network, and i havent been able to crack it with wordfiles because i always use a password containing both lovercase, uppercase and numbers

    so it would be great if theres a tool trying every possible combination till it finds the right
    From Penetration Tester's Open Source Toolkit, Volume 2:
    If you’re wondering about the possibility of computing true rainbow tables in the sense of creating hashes for every character in the keyspace, considering the following math: If you limited yourself to alphanumeric characters and no “special” characters (62 characters), the total keyspace for an 8 character password is in excess of 218 trillion. Considering that our 172,000 word file creates a single 7.2 MB hash file, the keyspace is 1.26 trillion times larger. Our answer is in the petabyte range (a petabyte is 1,000 terrabytes), which is far beyond any current (personal) storage capabilities. Adding special characters doesn’t make it anymore ridiculous, and that’s only one table for one SSID.
    I love being able to quote myself...
    "\x74\x68\x65\x70\x72\x65\x7a\x39\x38";

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