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Thread: MS fined yet again

  1. #1
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    Default MS fined yet again

    I just saw that MS have been fined a record 1.4 billion dollars for *still* failing to comply with the anti-trust suit from a few years back.........

    Maybe finally they'll have to consider complying and opening up a bit to competitors?
    Or, on the other hand, maybe the profit to fines ratio is still so significantly large as to allow them to continue regardless........

    If they do carry on regardless, the fines and news coverage might at least serve to make the general consumer a lot more aware that there *are* competitive products out there.

    There's been a definite trend recently of large businesses and also governments switching to open source OS's and software, so maybe we are seeing a wind of change, albeit a breeze at the moment

  2. #2
    Jenkem Addict imported_wyze's Avatar
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    They should make the major shareholders count every penny on the $1.4B by hand.
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    Nah, what they need to do is create a doubling, exponential fine. Every day they refuse to comply, the fine doubles itself. Payment must be made every month, but does not diminish the fine.

    So month 1 would be 100^31, Month 2 would be 100^60, and so on.

    I bet they would move fast after that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GunMonkey View Post
    Nah, what they need to do is create a doubling, exponential fine. Every day they refuse to comply, the fine doubles itself. Payment must be made every month, but does not diminish the fine.

    So month 1 would be 100^31, Month 2 would be 100^60, and so on.

    I bet they would move fast after that.
    Actually, after the last fine (3rd one for non-compliance maybe!?) there was a daily penalty in place from what I understand. Although not quite to the value you recommend

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    Senior Member Thorn's Avatar
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    I'll offer a contrary position on this: The government should forget it. It's wrong and stupid, and merely proof that if you are successful in today's world, that the government will try to bring you under their thumb. The prosecution and continued hounding of MS was and is unnecessary expense to the taxpayers. If anything, the US government should pay MS stockholders for the time wasted and the expenses the company incurred in its defense.

    There are very few, if any, markets that any government can every get involved with with out screwing it up beyond recognition. Read "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand, then compare it with today, and you'll may begin to understand why any government interference in the market is a Very Bad Thing.

    The market has spoken, and it shows where it always does, right at the bottom line. People buy MS products because they work for them, and MS has been smarter than others in getting those products to market.

    As to Open Source expanding into the market, many of the products are great, but they just don't work for the average user, and probably never will. In general, you have to have a technological bent to use Open Source items. While that may be fine for the people on this and similar forums, it won't work for the average PC user. For most people, who can't understand an automobile beyond putting gas in it, doing things like compiling from source is next to impossible. Open Source Operating Systems and applications may work for companies and agencies that have IT support staff, but they don't work for the average user.

    Personally, I hope MS continues to tell any government to pound sand.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thorn View Post
    As to Open Source expanding into the market, many of the products are great, but they just don't work for the average user, and probably never will. In general, you have to have a technological bent to use Open Source items. While that may be fine for the people on this and similar forums, it won't work for the average PC user. For most people, who can't understand an automobile beyond putting gas in it, doing things like compiling from source is next to impossible. Open Source Operating Systems and applications may work for companies and agencies that have IT support staff, but they don't work for the average user.
    I completely agree with this. The *nix zealots need to wake up and realize that MS isn't going anywhere anytime soon. I have yet to find a *nix solution that can do some of the very important things that I need done at work. The reason why I haven't found one, is because there isn't one, and there probably won't be one anytime soon.
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    My beef isn't the fact that MS is pretty ruthless when it comes to business practices, or that it has so much of the market. My irritation has always been with their inability to relax their death grip on their software, just a little.

    I fully realize that it will never be at the level of open source, but they could start small. Say, unlock the gui so you don't need an overpriced third party software to alter the look.

    Also, it would be nice to have Windows XX. Not 9 different types of windows vista, which all took the same amount of time to code, but have significantly different costs. Its not like they're paying $100 more to make ultimate DVD's.

    Still, I'm confident the market will maintain itself, and if MS slips too much, another OS will grab a huge chunk of the market.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GunMonkey View Post
    My irritation has always been with their inability to relax their death grip on their software, just a little..
    Although I understand what you are saying but at the same time the above is the same thing that other companies do with their products like soda makers coca-cola or food flavorings at restaurants. Not alot of people are mad at KFC for their "Secret blend of 11 herbs and spices".
    I hope you see my point.
    Right, wrong or indifferent I don't think MS will ever change this facet of their business model. It makes far to much money to just hand over to some outside entity.
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    It's strange you know, the age-old flamewars don't really have much to do with it here........

    I don't think it's "nix zealots" that have taken MS to court?

    Most of the problems, as considered by courts around the world, are more to do with anti-competitive practices against other Windows software developers......... particularly the likes of media player s/w, etc.

  10. #10
    Just burned his ISO Kriss128's Avatar
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    It was EU that fined MS, not the US government. The problem was the the MS OS is different in europe then north america. They were broking alot of three party software and cross-compatibility which went against their anti-competitive laws. The trigger of this was poor countries in the union use open source as there backbone, so they couldn't open items they recieved or sent items wouldn't open.

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