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Thread: UK teen is world's youngest certified ethical hacker

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    Default UK teen is world's youngest certified ethical hacker


    UK teen is world's youngest certified ethical hacker

    Kelly, who is now 16, says.

    It took Kelly about 10 months to complete the course work and pass the four-hour test required to get the accreditation. That included a five-day boot camp.

    He recently landed a spot as a temporary worker at the University Birmingham, where he expects to do IT-related work. He's considering acquiring additional accreditations for Cisco and Microsoft technologies.

    But eventually, he says, he plans to do security work.

    "Due to my age, it's probably not going to happen in the next five years," he says. "In the industry, you need to have a certain amount of experience. I hope to see myself doing security work of some some sort."
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/02...thical_hacker/

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    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    ...<sigh>...and the devaluation of the CEH begins.

    Bootcamps are such bad ideas.

    Why do they make it sound like tearing a computer apart and putting it back together again is a big deal? Ever since PnP and ACPI got relatively perfected, building PC's has become 1000% easier. I bet if he were handed a 386 machine with with soundcard, NIC, Scanner interface card, internal modem, two harddrives, and two CDRom, plus floppy, he'd never get it to work.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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    Just throw in an extra soundblaster cdrom drive as well, you know, one of the original ones and then watch the total confusion.

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    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by balding_parrot View Post
    Just throw in an extra soundblaster cdrom drive as well, you know, one of the original ones and then watch the total confusion.
    Yeah, I was thinking about that as well. When they had the CDRom controller on the card that took yet another IRQ and Base Memory address.

    Remember the days of spending hours tweaking your config.sys and autoexec.bat so you could get the most conventional memory as possible.

    Most systems came with 4 megs of ram and you had a hot system if you had 8 megs and 512K on your video card.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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    I agree streaker, I've been rebuilding system since my first 8086.
    Most computer now a days are like fisher price toys with everything that isn't integrated are colour coded and pnp. I havn't seen a board is years that you needed to configure dim switches or jumpers to get ever thing to work.

    But at least she will have her MCP/MCSA to fall back on ;)

    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    ...<sigh>...and the devaluation of the CEH begins.

    Bootcamps are such bad ideas.

    Why do they make it sound like tearing a computer apart and putting it back together again is a big deal? Ever since PnP and ACPI got relatively perfected, building PC's has become 1000% easier. I bet if he were handed a 386 machine with with soundcard, NIC, Scanner interface card, internal modem, two harddrives, and two CDRom, plus floppy, he'd never get it to work.

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    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Did you read the first post regarding that article? Glad I'm not the only one that feels that way.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    Yeah, I was thinking about that as well. When they had the CDRom controller on the card that took yet another IRQ and Base Memory address.

    Remember the days of spending hours tweaking your config.sys and autoexec.bat so you could get the most conventional memory as possible.

    Most systems came with 4 megs of ram and you had a hot system if you had 8 megs and 512K on your video card.
    Good old memmaker

    I remember paying almost $800 for 4 megs of ram

    I remember getting my first HDD it held a massive 10MB 5 1/4" wide and double the height of a cdrom drive today, and back then, I wondered if I would ever be able to fill it.

    8086 with a separate 8087

    Of course I remember stuff before that, but that is enough nostalgia for now.

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    I used to have a Saturday job polishing the cogs for Babbage

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    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by balding_parrot View Post
    Good old memmaker

    I remember paying almost $800 for 4 megs of ram

    I remember getting my first HDD it held a massive 10MB 5 1/4" wide and double the height of a cdrom drive today, and back then, I wondered if I would ever be able to fill it.

    8086 with a separate 8087

    Of course I remember stuff before that, but that is enough nostalgia for now.
    For all the kidlings out there, that would be known as a FullHeight drive, in case anyone one was wondering what Harddrive manufacturer's meant when they say a drive is 1/4" Height.

    My actual 80XX experience was on my Dad's Tandon 8088 machine, I used to play StarFlight for hours.

    Before that, I had played with about 90% of all those other 'personal computers' that were on the market before the IBM clones hit the market.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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    Just curious would that be before or after the commodore 64 and the atari 800XL home computer. We had a atari 800XL at my house about 18 years ago when I was 15. We were online with a company called comp-u-serve and I used to play all text role playing games. I got out of computers after that till about 98 when my interest was re sparked. We had those comodore 64's in school with cassette recorders. I have no idea what the stats were on our atari but I'm sure it wasn't much. I can remember waiting forever to connect and to make a move in the game.

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