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Thread: bt2 boots but kernel panic

  1. #1
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    Default bt2 boots but kernel panic

    hi everyone,

    i suceeded getting bt2final started and boot from my external HD but it really doesn't come up because I get a kernel panic which says this:

    Unable to load NLS charset utf8
    NTFS volume version 3.1.
    VFS: Mounted root (ntfs filesystem) readonly.
    Freeing unused kernel memory: 296k freed
    Warning: unable to open an initial console.
    Kernel panic - not syncing : No init found. Try passing init=option to kernel.


    After this the system doesn't do anything anylonger. I have an dualcore 1.8GHz cpu if it makes any difference. I absolutly don't know how to fix this problem. I followed the dualboot video on an other pc and no boot with changing the bios settings to boot from USB HD Drive and lilo comes up and i tell lilo to boot linux and then it says linux boot is ok and starts booting but soon i get this massage above.
    So please help my fixing this.

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Can you post the link to the video you used, I dont see it in the tutorial section.
    With lilo or grub the linux loader program has to be started either from the mbr, a boot floppy or on the first section of the boot partition.
    An initial ramdisk (initrd) will load drivers for hardware that needs to be available at boottime,
    as your hard disk is external usb, drivers for the usb hard drive and root file system will need to be loaded before the hardware is initialised. Perhaps in your case the initrd is missing, drivers omitted, or lilo is trying to boot the wrong partition, your message does state that the root filesystem is ntfs, thats not native linux.
    The alternative is for a monolithic kernel, all drivers are compiled not as modules but into the kernel. Post the link you followed, I'll take a look in the morning, Im not a BT2 expert but do happily multiboot linux but on my internal HD not external.

  3. #3
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    hi thanks for this explanation. this is the link
    offensive-security.com/movies/dualboot/dualboot.html


    Did i get you right that i have to install lilo on my internal drive and than i could use the external drive. Maybe i will do the whole installation ones more on my laptop and than give you the whole commands if something will go wrong.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by goon123 View Post
    hi thanks for this explanation. this is the link
    offensive-security.com/movies/dualboot/dualboot.html


    Did i get you right that i have to install lilo on my internal drive and than i could use the external drive. Maybe i will do the whole installation ones more on my laptop and than give you the whole commands if something will go wrong.

    OK, I have just seen the whole movie and it is very good, but this is an advanced installed, even for a seasoned linux user. Many distros like Ubuntu, Suse, Mandrake have a graphical installer much easier to use.

    The movie installed Backtrack on the same hard drive and installed lilo in the mbr. You have mad ethings difficult for yourself by installing on an external
    hard drive.
    You need to install lilo on the mbr of your hard disk to the mbr, or a floppy
    and modify lilo.conf, this is where you have gone wrong. Once lilo is installed your root partion for your external hard drive may be /dev/sda1 or
    wherever you have installed it. Post back the partitions and file systems you have used...... alternatively, boot with the live back track cd. Plug in your USB hard drive with partitions.
    Open a terminal and post the output of
    fdisk -l (thats l as "list")

    I should be able to see your partitions.

    Take notice of the video warning. It states to backup your windows software first

    Hope that helps

  5. #5
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    I had some of the same trouble when I was doing this same thing.
    One thing to make sure is that you are running lilo from the partition that you just installed backtrack to, not just from the live cd. Chroot is your friend.

    Make sure that it's pointing to the right lilo.conf file and that all the partitions are correct.


    I'm sorry, I wish I remembered more of what I did, it just took a little tinkering with. I'll post more if I remember.

    Good luck!

  6. #6
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    i typed fdsik -l ---> That comed out:

    Disk /dev/sda: 160 GB --->This is the internal drive

    Device Boot id System
    /dev/sda1 27 Unknown
    /dev/sda2 * 7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda3 7 HPFS/NTFS

    Device sdb: 160 GB --> external drive

    /dev/sdb1 83 linux
    /dev/sda2 82 linux swap
    /dev/sda3 83 linux
    /dev/sda4 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda5 7 HPFS/NTFS

    Explanation: sda --> internal:

    sda1: should be the sony viao recovery partition
    sda2 and sda3: to partiotions and sda2 is the windows



    sdb--> external

    sda1, sdb2,sdb3,--> the 3 linux partition i installed

    sda4--> I dont know where it comes from, looks wired

    sda5--> the rest space i decided to do an ntfs partition for windows

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by goon123 View Post
    i typed fdsik -l ---> That comed out:

    Disk /dev/sda: 160 GB --->This is the internal drive

    Device Boot id System
    /dev/sda1 27 Unknown
    /dev/sda2 * 7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda3 7 HPFS/NTFS

    Device sdb: 160 GB --> external drive

    /dev/sdb1 83 linux
    /dev/sda2 82 linux swap
    /dev/sda3 83 linux
    /dev/sda4 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda5 7 HPFS/NTFS

    Explanation: sda --> internal:

    sda1: should be the sony viao recovery partition
    sda2 and sda3: to partiotions and sda2 is the windows



    sdb--> external

    sda1, sdb2,sdb3,--> the 3 linux partition i installed

    sda4--> I dont know where it comes from, looks wired

    sda5--> the rest space i decided to do an ntfs partition for windows

    Right, now all you have to do is edit /etc/lilo.conf and then run lilo -v to install it.
    Your external hard drive partitions are all sdb not sda. Your root
    partition is either sdb1 or sdb3 you have to remember if you followed the tutorial they made the last partition / so it may be /dev/sdb3.
    Modifying your /etc/lilio.conf look for the backtrak stanza

    image=/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.20
    label=backtrack
    initrd=/boot/initrd-2.6.20.img
    read-only
    root=/dev/sdb3

    NOTE: The above is just an example, I'm on a different computer at the moment, so cant post the lilo.conf of backtrack

  8. #8
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    how do I edit this? Just open lilo with: nano /etc/lilo.conf and type what you typed for the bootable partition linux? Ofcause I have to edit the deviced to my root device. but what about the kernal, is it realy 2.6.20?
    I think thats what it should be.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by goon123 View Post
    how do I edit this? Just open lilo with: nano /etc/lilo.conf and type what you typed for the bootable partition linux? Ofcause I have to edit the deviced to my root device. but what about the kernal, is it realy 2.6.20?
    I think thats what it should be.
    Here is the lilo.conf from live BT2 final:

    # LILO configuration file
    # generated by 'liloconfig'
    #
    # Start LILO global section
    lba32 # Allow booting past 1024th cylinder with a recent BIOS
    boot = /dev/hda
    message = /boot/boot_message.txt
    prompt
    timeout = 1200
    # Override dangerous defaults that rewrite the partition table:
    change-rules
    reset
    # VESA framebuffer console @ 1024x768x256
    vga = 773
    # Windows bootable partition config begins
    other = /dev/hda1
    label = Windows
    table = /dev/hda
    # Windows bootable partition config ends
    # Linux bootable partition config begins
    image = /boot/vmlinuz
    root = /dev/hda2
    label = Linux
    read-only
    # Linux bootable partition config ends


    The kernel in /boot is called vmlinuz so your lilo.conf has to point to the correct kernel on the correct boot partition.

    Before you start make sure you have a windows ERD and test it. You are going to install lilo on the MBR, it it goes wrong you wont be able to boot windows, so make sure you have a bootable recovery disk or ERD installed on a partrtion. im not a windoze expert but to restore the windows mbr
    from the ERD use fixboot /mbr
    Make sure you test this before installing lilo. Overwriting the mbr wont make any difference to your system, its only the first 464 bytes (less the partition table) that gets overwritten

    Now to edit your lilo use nano with the following changes

    # LILO configuration file
    # generated by 'liloconfig'
    #
    # Start LILO global section
    lba32 # Allow booting past 1024th cylinder with a recent BIOS
    boot = /dev/hda
    message = /boot/boot_message.txt
    prompt
    timeout = 1200
    # Override dangerous defaults that rewrite the partition table:
    change-rules
    reset
    # VESA framebuffer console @ 1024x768x256
    vga = 773
    # End LILO global section
    # Windows bootable partition config begins
    other = /dev/sda1
    label = Windows
    table = /dev/sda
    # Windows bootable partition config ends
    # Linux bootable partition config begins
    image = /boot/vmlinuz
    root = /dev/sdb3
    label = Linux
    read-only
    # Linux bootable partition config ends


    You then install lilo to the mbr with lilo -v
    If you look at the above lilo, windows will load from sda1 correct from your fdisk and BT from sdb3 (assuming you made partitions as in the tutorial).

    Personally Backtrack is superb but better value to me as a live distro. Its therefore portable, and can be used anywhere to highlight your friends security wealnesses (with their consent). If you want to dual boot you may be better off installing a distro like Ubuntu or PCLinux OS.

  10. #10
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    holy shit

    I did it once more and finished it sucessfully i thought. But now something went wrong. holy shit. I reboot the laptop an see only this: L 99 99 999 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99

    what the hell is it how to fix it?

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