View Poll Results: What type of system do you use most?

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Thread: ubuntu?

  1. #1
    Just burned his ISO
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    Unhappy ubuntu?

    I understand the change to the .deb system in an attempt to start get a full distro up and running. But why the change form the slax and slackware system. Its so much easier to use. I feel disenfranchised.

    I guess my LVM's are no good anymore.
    Atleast all the clickware/NT users will be excited.
    Isnt a slim ubuntu kernel a oxymoron?

    Please do not turn Backtrack into blotware.

    One question. How long will it take for someone to set up a second set of forms on Ubuntu forms? especially on compiz-fusion.

    the death of the slacker one distro at a time.

    Click Click yo.

  2. #2
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    I've used BT2 and BT3 for the past year and a half. BT3 actually made me want to change from Ubuntu to Slackware as my main OS. I'm not fond of the Ubuntu/Debian package management system but I can see it reaching a wider audience.

    No matter what, I'm excited to try out the new release. Thank you devs for your hard work.

    BTW, I believe you can still install lzm's if you'd like.

  3. #3
    Just burned his ISO
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    I don't claim to speak for the team, so I may be talking out my ass.

    I read that the plan was to have BT4 as an actual distro with Repositories. While that may seem like adding chocolate to the milk to get the kids to drink it, it actually helps the developers.

    With dependency tracking and the like, patches, fixes, etc can be pushed out so everyone is on the same page. The community has some awesome contributors like Dr_green who is inundated with "I followed your instructions to the T and it didn't work." It's not because Dr_Green messed up or everyone who fails is "pants-on-head" retarded, but because everyone has done something, some way to their install. Be it as small as installing pidgin, it could have over-written a dependency somewhere. Even if they have a bone-stock install you can't ask someone to go back and do it from bone-stock because you haven't done the same thing.

    Now if someone does something ground breaking that they would like to add to the community, they can let a dev know, if a dev likes it will get added. Then everyone benefits.

    Yes, you can release patch lists, write how-tos, have everyone manually install. However that's akin to having a bunch of architects working on one project, all of them changing their plans then start building. The results may be great, but they may also be an engineering nightmare.

    Plus I think this might get the Development team some recognition they so deserve.

    That's just my point-of-view, but like I said, it's from a layman.

  4. #4
    Very good friend of the forum Virchanza's Avatar
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    Am I the only one that wouldn't even notice a switch between different distroes? All the same stuff still works at the command line. Switching desktop environments would be a bigger deal for me than switching distroes.

    I've said this before... but I really don't understand how people can say that Ubuntu is more "point and click" than Slackware. In Ubuntu, if I want to change my username, I can manually edit the "passwd" file just like in any other Linux distro. Sure, there's a convenient graphical tool for doing it in Ubuntu, but I choose to learn the "Linux way" of doing it because then I can do it on any Linux system, whether it be Fedora, Slackware, Gentoo.

    How is Slackware different from Ubuntu? OK it doesn't have the handy little graphical tools for doing stuff like editing "passwd", but of course you can download these tools and use them in Slackware if you're so inclined.

    I use Ubuntu as my main operating system because:
    1) It's Linux (I can do stuff like "ifconfig" and also edit my "resolv.conf" file)
    2) It's continuously worked on by countless people, and has huge support forums

    I have to say the main thing that makes me choose Ubuntu is "apt-get install". Like for instance, if I want to install Code::Blocks, I just open up a terminal and type:

    apt-get install codeblocks

    I love "apt-get install", it's way better than navigating to a 3rd party website every time I want to download something. (Maybe the Slackware users among us would prefer the point-and-click interface of using their web browser to navigate to a download site )

    I feel that somebody is being disingenuous if they say that Slackware is "more hardcore" or "more Linux" than any other distro. The fact of the matter is that Slackware gives you less choice, it makes you do stuff at the commandline because it doesn't have all the convenient little tools already installed (or then again maybe it does have some tools installed, it uses the KDE desktop after all which comes with a Control Panel of sorts). With Ubuntu, I have choice, I can do stuff in a terminal, or I can use a handy little GUI tool.

    I think the desktop environment you choose is far more important than the distro. For instance I nearly vomitted when I tried Ubuntu-with-KDE4, but I loved Ubuntu-with-Xfce as soon as I started using it.

    When you first install Ubuntu, it's suited for retards... but then so is every popular operating system when you first install it. I mean just look at Microsoft Windows XP; after you first install it, you've to do stuff like "Show file extensions" and "Don't hide system files". I've installed Microsoft Windows XP dozens of times of the last few years, and I always had to take extra time after the installation to change it from "retard user" to "power user".

    Ubuntu's installation is the same. After I installed Ubuntu the last time, I did stuff like disable the network manager, and I gave my "fstab" a good going over, I re-arranged the panels, I change the fonts, and I changed the DISGUSTING default theme.
    Ask questions on the open forums, that way everybody benefits from the solution, and everybody can be corrected when they make mistakes. Don't send me private messages asking questions that should be asked on the open forums, I won't respond. I decline all "Friend Requests".

  5. #5
    Jenkem Addict imported_wyze's Avatar
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    polls are for poles :/
    dd if=/dev/swc666 of=/dev/wyze

  6. #6
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    I believe this was discussed in the muts/bt4 blog

    http://backtrack4.blogspot.com/2009_01_01_archive.html



    [edit - sorry for mistake, try and follow too many pages, got confused]
    wtf?

  7. #7
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    My first choose would be Debian but Ubuntu has evolved a lot since it's launch.

    Slack,Slackware and Gentoo have there uses but also have there own quirks.

    I know the decision to swap was not taken lightly by any of the Dev's and a lot of hard work was just into BT4 to customize and enhance original but if you don't like using a system based on ubuntu then don't use it, nobody if forcing you to. Stay with BT3 and do all the updating yourself.

  8. #8
    My life is this forum Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOFH139 View Post
    My first choose would be Debian but Ubuntu has evolved a lot since it's launch.

    Slack,Slackware and Gentoo have there uses but also have there own quirks.

    I know the decision to swap was not taken lightly by any of the Dev's and a lot of hard work was just into BT4 to customize and enhance original but if you don't like using a system based on ubuntu then don't use it, nobody if forcing you to. Stay with BT3 and do all the updating yourself.
    Or install Slackware 12.2 and then install all the BackTrack apps, from source.
    Of course, if you really wanted to have some fun, go to Wal-Mart late at night and ask the greeter if they could help you find trashbags, roll of carpet, rope, quicklime, clorox and a shovel. See if they give you any strange looks. --Streaker69

  9. #9
    Very good friend of the forum Virchanza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Or install Slackware 12.2 and then install all the BackTrack apps, from source.
    Or install Ubuntu and then open up a terminal in Ubuntu and type:

    apt-get install nmap wireshark netdiscover ettercap kismet

    Of course the downside is you'll probably have to go make a cup of tea because the automatic installation process might take a little while depending on your internet connection
    Ask questions on the open forums, that way everybody benefits from the solution, and everybody can be corrected when they make mistakes. Don't send me private messages asking questions that should be asked on the open forums, I won't respond. I decline all "Friend Requests".

  10. #10
    Senior Member streaker69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Or install Slackware 12.2 and then install all the BackTrack apps, from source.
    This is by far the best way to learn Linux.

    Of course, dependency hell really sucks.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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