Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: i have many file in windows & want use them in backtrack, and inverse.

  1. #1
    Just burned his ISO
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    3

    Question i have many file in windows & want use them in backtrack, and inverse.

    i need help.

    I have many file in windows and i want to use them in backtrack. how to access them?

    also there is another question, i have few file in backtrack & i want to use them in windows. how to?

    i thank from everyone that can help me.

  2. #2
    Senior Member ShadowKill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    908

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RP_Exploit View Post
    i need help.

    I have many file in windows and i want to use them in backtrack. how to access them?

    also there is another question, i have few file in backtrack & i want to use them in windows. how to?

    i thank from everyone that can help me.
    It really depends on what files you are talking about.

    You should be able to use whatever files you need from windows within Back|Track, although some of them may require that you use WINE. For accessing linux files within windows you will need to download an inter-filesystem application. I cannot recall the name right now but I'll find it in a few minutes.



    "The goal of every man should be to continue living even after he can no longer draw breath."

    ~ShadowKill

  3. #3
    Very good friend of the forum Virchanza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    863

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RP_Exploit View Post
    i need help.

    I have many file in windows and i want to use them in backtrack. how to access them?
    All files get stored within a file system. Here's a few well-known kinds of filesystem:

    FAT16, FAT32, ext2, ext3, NTFS, CDFS

    The Microsoft Windows line of operating systems typically uses the NTFS file system, whereas Linux tends to use ext2 (or its successor, ext3).

    Linux comes with a built-in facility for accessing the NTFS file system.

    On Linux, there's the concept of "mounting" a file system. Each file system has a name, something like "/dev/sda0". Here's how you mount an NTFS file system:

    mkdir /mnt/sda0
    mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda0 /mnt/sda0


    also there is another question, i have few file in backtrack & i want to use them in windows. how to?
    MS Windows can't access ext2 or ext3 filesystems by itself, so you have to install a little program on MS Windows to let you access your Linux file system.

    Here's a good guide:

    http://www.howtoforge.com/access-lin...s-from-windows
    Ask questions on the open forums, that way everybody benefits from the solution, and everybody can be corrected when they make mistakes. Don't send me private messages asking questions that should be asked on the open forums, I won't respond. I decline all "Friend Requests".

  4. #4
    Just burned his ISO
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Code:
    [QUOTE=Virchanza;117207]All files get stored within a file system. Here's a few well-known kinds of filesystem:
    
    FAT16, FAT32, ext2, ext3, NTFS, CDFS
    
    The Microsoft Windows line of operating systems typically uses the NTFS file system, whereas Linux tends to use ext2 (or its successor, ext3).
    
    Linux comes with a built-in facility for accessing the NTFS file system.
    
    On Linux, there's the concept of "mounting" a file system. Each file system has a name, something like "/dev/sda0". Here's how you mount an NTFS file system:
    
    mkdir /mnt/sda0
    mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda0 /mnt/sda0
    when I use this command, show this message:

    "Failed to access '/dev/sda0': No such file or directory"

    I looked at "/dev" directory and instead of this, I use this command:

    mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda0

    but show this is message:

    NTFS signature is missing.
    Tried to free NULL inode pointer (0x805330c)
    Tried to free NULL attribute pointer (0x8053364)
    Tried to free NULL inode pointer (0x8053360)
    Tried to free NULL attribute pointer (0x8053378)
    Tried to free NULL attribute pointer (0x8053374)
    Tried to free NULL inode pointer (0x8053370)
    Tried to free NULL attribute pointer (0x805338c)
    Tried to free NULL inode pointer (0x8053388)
    Failed to startup volume: Invalid argument
    Failed to mount '/dev/sda1': Invalid argument
    The device '/dev/sda1' doesn't have a valid NTFS.
    Maybe you selected the wrong device? Or the whole disk instead of a
    partition (e.g. /dev/hda, not /dev/hda1)? Or the other way around?
    Code:
    MS Windows can't access ext2 or ext3 filesystems by itself, so you have to install a little program on MS Windows to let you access your Linux file system.
    
    Here's a good guide:

    I use Back|track and this is run on VMware. so tools that introduced in this link, did not solve my problem.

    thank you about your attention.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •